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August 7, 2020

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Emotional Intelligence And Money

Emotional Intelligence And Money

We’re used to thinking of intelligence as our ability to process and master new information.

It’s not something we usually associate with kindness or compassion or empathy. In fact, we might think of highly intelligent people as being cold and almost robotic! But there’s more to intelligence than being able to recall obscure facts or recite esoteric trivia.

Intelligence isn’t just about learning what you’d find in a textbook. Our brains receive emotional and personal information every day that we have to understand and act upon. The ability to identify and manage these feelings successfully is rated as emotional intelligence, and it plays a role in our quality of life. It also makes a big difference in how much we make. Some research indicates that people with a high emotional intelligence score (also called EQ) make an average of $29,000 more than people with a lower score.(1)

But… why?

Why would understanding and processing our emotions correlate with a higher annual income? How else could your EQ affect your financial life? Let’s explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and money!

Emotional intelligence helps you make wise decisions
We all have feelings about money. And those feelings impact our decision-making process. You might be really proud of how much you earn and want to flaunt that with purchases you make. Or spending might be difficult for you because of your background and upbringing. Maybe you’re afraid to even look at your bank account after a stress-fueled shopping spree.

Identifying those feelings is essential to understanding your financial decisions. It helps you recognize your motivations and the processes that lead to certain actions. And once you’ve identified those root feelings, you can start to make changes that will alter your actions.

High emotional intelligence is a workplace advantage
To start with, there are some fields where emotional intelligence is foundational. Recognizing and empathizing with the emotions of others is pretty much required if you’re a counselor, a diplomat, or any kind of negotiator. But you might be surprised by how much EQ can affect success in other careers. Building and maintaining relationships can give you an edge in just about any workplace or market. For instance, L’oreal increased net revenue by $2.5 million by prioritizing EQ when hiring salespeople.(2) Most effective leaders have high EQs.(3) It makes sense; it’s much easier to inspire people when you understand their motivations and feelings and speak to their specific goals.

How to increase your emotional intelligence
So how can you boost your emotional intelligence? Here are a few simple practices that can make a big difference in how you relate to others and interact with your feelings.

- Process your own emotions. Try to capture how you feel in a three word sentence. That could be something like “I feel happy” or “I feel frustrated” or “I feel tired.” Avoid framing those sentences in terms of what other people are doing. Steer clear of “you are blank” and consider your own emotions!

- Consider another perspective. Empathy is key to emotional intelligence. Try to see the situation through the other person’s eyes the next time you start to get frustrated or annoyed. What does this person value? Do they have past experiences that are influencing their actions? Are they doing something out of fear or anger?

- Control your feelings. This is the tricky part. It’s one thing to recognize that you’re angry or sad. It’s another thing to reign in those emotions before you act on them and potentially make a situation worse. Remembering to pause for a moment and breathe deeply in stressful situations can be a huge help. Ask yourself if this issue will be important tomorrow or if you’re just getting swept away in the moment. Sometimes it’s best to remove yourself from the situation to gain a bit of clarity and perspective!

Emotional intelligence might not seem important compared to other skills. Being aware of your feelings isn’t something you can put on a resume, and it’s not normally enough to land you that dream job. But it can give you a key advantage as your career progresses. Try developing some of the EQ skills mentioned in this article and see where they take you!

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