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September 28, 2020

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Your credit score – 4 things you need to know

August 26, 2020

Your credit score – 4 things you need to know

You’re probably aware that your credit score is usually accessed when you apply for new credit, such as a credit card or an auto loan.

But you may not know it might also be requested by landlords, employers, and even romantic partners.[i]

So what are your credit score and report, what are the factors that determine them, and why do so many diverse parties request to see them?

What is a credit score and what is a credit report?
Your credit score is simply a number that encapsulates your ability to repay debt. It isn’t the only way interested parties can assess your creditworthiness, but it’s certainly often used as a preliminary factor. Having a higher score may lead to lower interest rates, more successful credit applications, and possibly more trust in general.

Your credit report is much more comprehensive and shows your outstanding debts, how well you pay them, the age of the accounts, and so forth. A single bad account on your credit report might damage your score, but your counterparty may be willing to work with you if you can show a strong history with your other accounts – and can justify the problem account.

What constitutes your credit score?
Credit reports are maintained by the three main credit reporting agencies: TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian. A credit score is generated by FICO, VantageScore, and some financial institutions may have their own proprietary algorithms to determine their own scores.

In general, scores are determined by the variously-weighted categories of payment history, the amount owed (credit utilization), the age of the accounts, how much new credit you’ve requested recently, and the types of accounts (revolving, mortgage, student loans, etc.).[ii] Of course proprietary scores may take many other factors into consideration.

Who wants to see your credit score?
Lenders may screen you based on your credit score, then use other factors to determine if they’ll give you a loan. Instant-approval lenders, like credit card companies, may just use your credit score to determine your creditworthiness. For large, long-term loans, like mortgages, you can expect to have to turn over your credit report as well.

Landlords may ask for a report, but might also request your credit score as well. They have the obvious financial interest in relying on you to pay your rent from month to month, but they also may have in mind that if you’re responsible with your money, perhaps you’ll also be responsible to take care of your rented living quarters.

Employers may ask to see your credit report. They may make hiring decisions based on the report, but some states have disallowed the practice.[iii] The chance that financial hardship may prompt employee theft is one reason they may ask, as well as wanting to see your consistency in paying debts over time, which may correlate with your punctuality and persistence at work.

How to improve your score
Those with poor credit may want to improve their credit history, which may in turn improve their credit scores. Payment history makes up 35% of the FICO scoring factors, and this will take time to improve. However, 30% of the score is determined by how much you owe, which can quickly be improved by paying down your debt. The 15% determinant that is credit age can, of course, only improve with time, but the 10% of your score attributed to new requests and 10% to types of credit can be managed in a short timeframe, too; try to avoid applying for a lot of new credit and, when you do, try to get different types of credit.[iv]

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Considering a home equity loan?

July 1, 2020

Considering a home equity loan?

Home prices may be leveling off in some areas but they’ve had a healthy recovery nationwide, leading to massive amounts of untapped equity.

According to a recent report, the average homeowner gained nearly $15,000 in equity in the past year and has nearly $115,000 available to draw.[i]

This can be good news if you need to increase your cash flow to pay for a special project or unusual expense.

Home equity risks It might be obvious, but a home equity loan is secured by your home, based on the equity you’ve built. Your eligibility for a home equity loan involves several factors, but a primary consideration is going to be the difference between your home’s market value and the remaining balance on the mortgage. Keep in mind that missed payments due to a job loss, illness, or another financial setback may put your home at risk from two loans – the original mortgage and the home equity loan. Before you take out this type of loan, make sure you have a solid strategy in place for repayment.

Home equity loan costs Funds acquired through a home equity loan can feel like found money, but keep in mind that a home equity loan takes an asset and converts it to debt – often for up to 30 years. As such, you’ll be paying certain fees to use the money.

Home equity loans often have closing costs of 2% to 5% of the loan amount.[ii] It might be worth it to shop around, however, to see if you can find a lender who won’t bury you in fees and loan charges. Interest rates may vary depending on your credit rating and other factors, but you can expect to pay about 6% or higher. If you were to borrow $100,000 of the $115,000 the average homeowner now has in equity, the interest costs over 30 years would be $115,000 – $15,000 more than you borrowed. If you can manage a 15-year term instead, this would drop the interest costs down to about $52,000.[iii] Carefully consider what you’ll use the funds to purchase. A new patio addition to your home or a pool with a deck may not add enough value to your home to offset the interest costs.

Tax benefits Once upon a time, the interest for a home equity loan was tax deductible, much like the interest on a primary mortgage. Now, there are some rules attached to the tax benefit. If you use the loan funds to make improvements to the home you’re borrowing against, you can usually deduct the interest. In the past, the tax benefit didn’t consider how the funds were used.[iv]

Home equity loans can be a powerful financial tool. But as with many tools, it’s important to exercise caution. Before signing on the dotted line, be sure you understand the long-term cost of the loan. With interest rates climbing, a home equity loan isn’t as attractive a source of funding as it once was.

Depending on how the funds are used, a home equity loan can make sense. If you’re buried in high-interest debt, like credit cards, the math might work to your favor. However, if the money is spent on a shiny, red sports car and a trip to Vegas, it might be tough to make a financial argument for that – unless you win big.

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This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to promote any certain products, plans, or strategies that may be available to you. Before taking out any loan or enacting a funding strategy, seek the advice of a financial professional, accountant, and/or tax expert to discuss your options.

[i] https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/09/homeowners-sitting-on-record-amount-of-cash-and-not-tapping-it.html
[ii] https://www.lendingtree.com/home/home-equity/home-equity-loan-closing-costs/
[iii] https://www.mortgageloan.com/calculator/loan-line-payment-calculator
[iv] https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/21/5-things-to-know-before-taking-out-a-home-equity-loan.html

What Happens When You Don't Pay Your Debts

June 8, 2020

What Happens When You Don't Pay Your Debts

Movies make defaulting on debt look scary.

Broken glass, bloody noses, and shouts of “Where’s my money!” come flooding to mind when we think of those poor souls in films who can’t pay back the down-and-dirty street lender. But what happens if we’re late on a mortgage payment or our credit card bill? It turns out there are several steps that creditors typically go through to get their money (and none of them involve baseball bats!).

Debt collectors
Debt that doesn’t get paid within 60 days typically gets handed over to a debt collection agency. These companies will attempt to entice you into coughing up what you owe. They’ll then hand that cash over to whoever hired them, keeping a portion for themselves. Remember, debt collectors can’t drain your account directly. Instead, you’ll receive calls and notifications and reminders to pay up. This can occur until up to 180 days after you fail to make a payment.

Credit score hit
Lenders want to know if you’ll be able to pay back money that they loan you. They look at your credit report (a history of your debt payments) to determine if they can trust you. The information in that report gets crunched by an algorithm to produce a credit score. It’s a shorthand way for lenders to evaluate your creditworthiness and decide if they want to loan you money.

Failure to pay your debts can end up on your credit report. Consistently missing payments and not paying for days and months can seriously affect your credit score. That means creditors can deny you loans or crank up your interest rate. Yikes.

Lawsuits
But what happens if you don’t pay when the debt collectors come around? After about 180 days your debt will be considered charged-off, meaning it’s not likely to be paid.(1) This presents creditors with a few different options. Sometimes, they’ll decide that the debt just isn’t worth it, cancel the collection effort, and move on. Collectors could also negotiate, settle for a smaller portion of the debt, and call it done. But creditors could also take the debtor to court and legally attempt to recover the money they’re owed.

A great practice is to not rack up debt at all. A good practice is to take on debt only in rare circumstances. But the best practice is to make sure you pay off any debt you owe on time!

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What Are the Effects of Closing a Credit Card?

June 1, 2020

What Are the Effects of Closing a Credit Card?

Americans owe over $900 billion in credit card debt, and credit card interest rates are on the rise again – now over 15%.

If you’re on a mission to reduce or eliminate your credit card debt, you may decide to just close all your credit cards. However, some of the consequences may not be what you’d expect.

Lingering Effects: The Good and the Bad
Many of us have heard that credit card information stays on your credit report for 7 years. That’s true for negative information, including events as large as a foreclosure. Positive events, however, stay for 10 years. In either case, canceling your credit card now will reduce the credit you have available, but the history – good or bad – will remain on your credit report for years to come.

Times when cancelling a card may be your best bet:

  • A card charges an annual fee. If you’re being charged an annual fee for the privilege of having a credit card, it may be better to cancel the card, particularly if you don’t use the card often or have other options available.
  • Uncontrolled spending. If “retail therapy” is impeding your financial future by creating an ever-growing mountain of debt, it may be best to eliminate the temptation of buying with credit by cutting up those cards.

When You Might Want to Hang Onto a Credit Card:
You may not have known that one aspect your credit score is the age of your accounts. Canceling a much older account in favor of a newer account can leave a dent in your credit score. And canceling the card won’t erase any negative history, so it may be best to hang on to the older credit account as long as there are no costs to the card. Also, the effects of canceling an older account may be larger when you’re younger than if you have a long credit history.

Credit Utilization Affects Your Credit Score
Lenders and credit bureaus also look at credit utilization, which refers to how much of your available credit you’re using. Lower percentages help your credit score, but high utilization can work against you.

For example, if you have $20,000 in credit available and $10,000 in credit card balances, your credit utilization is 50 percent. If you close a credit card that has a credit limit of $5,000, your available credit drops to $15,000, but your credit utilization jumps to 67 percent (if the credit card balances remain unchanged). If you’re carrying high balances, going on a credit card cancelling rampage can have negative effects because your credit utilization can skyrocket.

To sum it all up, if unnecessary spending is out of control or there is a cost to having a particular credit card, it may be best to cancel the card. In other cases, however, it’s often better to just use credit cards occasionally, or if you have an emergency.

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Tips on Managing Money for Couples

December 30, 2019

Tips on Managing Money for Couples

Couplehood can be a wonderful blessing, but – as you may know – it can have its challenges as well.

In fact, money matters are the leading cause of stress in modern relationships. The age-old adage that love trumps riches may be true, but if money is tight or if a couple isn’t meeting their financial goals, there could be some unpleasant conversations (er, arguments) on the bumpy road to bliss with your partner or spouse.

These tips may help make the road to happiness a little easier.

1. Set a goal for debt-free living. Certain types of debt can be difficult to avoid, such as mortgages or car payments, but other types of debt, like credit cards in particular, can grow like the proverbial snowball rolling down a hill. Credit card debt often comes about because of overspending or because insufficient savings forced the use of credit for an unexpected situation. Either way, you’ll have to get to the root of the cause or the snowball might get bigger. Starting an emergency fund or reigning in unnecessary spending – or both – can help get credit card balances under control so you can get them paid off.

2. Talk about money matters. Having a conversation with your partner about money is probably not at the top of your list of fun-things-I-look-forward-to. This might cause many couples to put it off until the “right time”. If something is less than ideal in the way your finances are structured, not talking about it won’t make the problem go away. Instead, frustrations over money can fester, possibly turning a small issue into a larger problem. Discussing your thoughts and concerns about money with your partner regularly (and respectfully) is key to reaching an understanding of each other’s goals and priorities, and then melding them together for your goals as a couple.

3. Consider separate accounts with one joint account. As a couple, most of your financial obligations will be faced together, including housing costs, monthly utilities and food expenses, and often auto expenses. In most households, these items ideally should be paid out of a joint account. But let’s face it, it’s no fun to have to ask permission or worry about what your partner thinks every time you buy a specialty coffee or want that new pair of shoes you’ve been eyeing. In addition to your main joint account, having separate accounts for each of you may help you maintain some independence and autonomy in regard to personal spending.

With these tips in mind, here’s to a little less stress so you can put your attention on other “couplehood” concerns… Like where you two are heading for dinner tonight – the usual hangout (which is always good), or that brand new place that just opened downtown? (Hint: This is a little bit of a trick question. The answer is – whichever place fits into the budget that you two have already decided on, together!)

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Emergency Fund 101: Protecting and Growing Your Fund

Emergency Fund 101: Protecting and Growing Your Fund

Nearly 60% of Americans report that they don’t have savings to turn to in the event of an emergency.

A measly 41% of Americans surveyed said they had savings to cover the cost of the unexpected. Being blindsided with an emergency could leave anyone who’s unprepared in the awkward and difficult position of asking family or friends for a loan or building up lots of credit card debt. A less stressful and debt-accruing answer to preparing yourself and your loved ones for a financial emergency like an unexpected hospital visit, house and car repairs, or even a sudden loss of employment is an Emergency Fund.

As you begin to save money to build your Emergency Fund, use these 5 tips to protect and grow your “I did not see that coming” stash:

1. Separate your Emergency Fund from your primary spending account. How often does the amount of money in your primary spending account change? Regular daily use, direct deposit, automatic withdrawals, spontaneous splurges – All of this in a single account can make it hard to track the actual amount of emergency spending money you have available. Start a separate account for your Emergency Fund to avoid any questions about whether or not you can afford that new water heater.

2. Know your number. You may hear a lot about making sure that you’re saving for retirement and never missing a life insurance premium. Solid advice. And don’t pause either of those important pieces of your financial plan to build your Emergency Fund. Instead, tack building your Emergency Fund onto your plan. The same way you know what amount you need to retire and what amount you need to pay each month for your life insurance policy, know how much you need to set aside for you and your loved ones to have a comfortable Emergency Fund. A goal of at least $1,000 to 3 months of your income or more is recommended. At least 3 months of income may sound high, but if you experience a sudden loss of income, you’d have at least 3 full months of breathing room to get back on track.

3. Avoid bank fees. These are Emergency Fund Public Enemy No. 1. Putting extra money aside can be challenging enough, but having that money whittled away by bank fees is even worse. Avoid feeling like you’re paying twice for an emergency (once for the emergency itself and second for the fees) by using an account that doesn’t charge you any fees and preferably doesn’t have a minimum account balance requirement. You can find out what you’re in for on your bank’s website or talking to an employee.

4. Do Not Touch (but leave yourself the option). Once you begin setting aside money in your Emergency Fund, the number one rule is: Do Not Touch… Unless it’s an emergency. Best case scenario, that money is just going to be sitting, unused, for a long time. However, just because it’s an “out of sight, out of mind” situation, it doesn’t mean that there aren’t some important details that need to be present for your Emergency Fund account:

  • Funds must be easily liquidated.
  • Amount of funds should be stable.

You definitely don’t want funds to be locked up and worth less than what you thought when you need them. If you revisited an untouched Emergency Fund after 20 years that didn’t have these 2 qualities, you may not be able to get all of the money you need out at once and inflation could leave you wanting. Although these qualities might prevent any significant gain to your fund, you still have the opportunity to make the best of it.

5. Get started immediately. There’s no better way to grow your Emergency Fund than to get started!

So avoid that dreaded phone call to your parents or your children. Don’t apply for another credit card (or two). Start growing and protecting your own Emergency Fund, and give yourself the potential to be prepared for the unexpected.

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Making Money Goals That Get You There

Making Money Goals That Get You There

Making financial goals is like hanging a map on your wall to remind you of where you want to go someday.

Your map might have your whole journey outlined with tacks and twine. It may be dotted with pictures pulled from travel magazines and Google searches. You could know every twist and turn by heart. But to get where you want to go, you still have to make a few real-life moves toward your destination.

Here are 5 tips for making money goals that have the potential to get you closer to the financial destination you set:

1. Figure out what’s motivating your financial decisions. Thinking about your “why” is a great way to start moving in the right direction. Goals like early retirement, paying off your house or car, and even a second honeymoon in Hawaii may immediately leap to mind. Take some time to evaluate what you value most and where they rank in relation to each other. This can help set your financial destination.

2. Manage Your Money. This doesn’t mean getting an MBA in finance or becoming a mutual fund manager. Managing your money can be as simple as organizing your money into appropriate accounts – and organizing the documents and details related to your money. Account statements, insurance policies, tax returns, or wills – important papers like these need to be as well-managed as your incoming paycheck. A large part of getting to your financial destination is knowing where to find a document when you need to find it.

3. Track Your Money. After your money comes in, where does it go out? Keep careful record of your spending habits for a while and the answer may surprise you. There are a plethora of tools you can find on app stores to link to your bank account to see where things are actually going. Are you a stress buyer, usually good with your money until it’s the only thing within your control? Or do you spend, spend, spend as soon as your direct deposit hits, then transform into the most frugal individual on the planet… until the next direct deposit hits? Track your spending habits for a while, and you may find you have a pattern that will be good to keep in mind (or avoid) as you trek toward your financial destination.

4. Keep an Eye on Your Credit. Building a strong credit report will assist in striving for many of your future financial goals. Building good credit relies heavily on making loan payments on time and reducing debt. Not doing either of those could mean being denied for loans, higher interest rates, and more unpleasant consequences that can keep you from getting closer to your financial destination. There are multiple programs can let you know where you stand and help to keep track of your credit score.

5. Know Your Number. This is the ultimate financial destination: How much money are you trying to save? Retirement at 65 is a great goal, but without an actual number to work towards, it’s just a passing fancy. Paying off your car or your student loans has to happen, but if you’d like to do it on time – or maybe even pay them off sooner – you need a number to set aside each month. And that second honeymoon to Hawaii? Even this one needs a number attached to it!

What do you already have in place for your trip to your financial destination? Do you know how much you can set aside aside for retirement and still have some left over for that Hawaii trip? And do you have any ideas about how to raise that credit score? Looking at where you are and figuring out what you need to do to get where you want to go can be easier with help. Plus, what’s a road trip without a buddy? Call me anytime!

… All right, all right, you can pick the road tunes first.

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Bankruptcy – Consequences and Aftermath

Bankruptcy – Consequences and Aftermath

If you or a loved one is at (or think you may be at) the place where you’re wondering if declaring bankruptcy[i] may be the path to take, there are several serious consequences to be aware of.

Depending on the type of bankruptcy (Chapter 7 or Chapter 13)[ii], debts may be eliminated, reduced, or restructured into a less burdensome repayment plan.

But what about the consequences that arise during the process itself, and what is the aftermath?

Before and During Filing
Before you even file there are consequences that can arise from bankruptcy proceedings: the law requires that the filer undergo credit counseling [iii] by a government-approved entity to ensure the filer understands what will take place during the process and have a chance to look at other options. If bankruptcy still seems to be the only viable option, the filer will then have to file in federal court, paying a filing fee of hundreds of dollars.[iv]

During the process, a schedule of assets and liabilities must be submitted for review by the court. That means the creditors and court will be able to look into your private financial life. Furthermore, the bankruptcy will become part of the public record, and therefore your financial details will be exposed to public scrutiny. Next, in Chapter 7, nonexempt assets will be sold by the trustee to help pay creditors. For Chapter 13, the court, creditors, and debtor will work out a repayment plan based on the financial situation of the debtor.

Discharge usually occurs for Chapter 7 within a few months, and the debtor will be free of the debts. In Chapter 13, discharge comes as a result of successfully completing the repayment plan. If the schedule of assets and liabilities is not filed in a timely manner, the request may be dismissed. If the repayment plan is not strictly followed, the court may dismiss the process and decide in favor of the creditors (who may repossess assets).

Impact on Your Credit Report
Once discharge occurs, the debtor will have escaped from the shadow of debt. However, the ghosts of the filing will remain on the credit report for several years.[v] A Chapter 13 filing will stay for seven years, while a Chapter 7 filing will remain for ten years. It should be no surprise that a bankruptcy, regardless of type, will negatively impact your credit score.[vi] However, over time if an applicant can show a good faith attempt to repay the debts, and begin to develop good credit habits, creditors may be more willing to cooperate.

Successive Filings
One important point to consider is the ability to refile. Because Chapter 7 completely erases debts, possibly with very little partial payment required if the debtor’s nonexempt assets are minimal, the debtor must wait eight years before another discharge would be granted. (One may file bankruptcy before this time, but a discharge – the actual debt elimination – would not be granted.) On the other hand, a restructuring under Chapter 13 is less detrimental to creditors, so another discharge may be granted in a bankruptcy that is filed just two years after the first bankruptcy is filed.

The concurrent and subsequent, long lasting consequences of filing bankruptcy are significant, and those who can avoid bankruptcy should certainly consider all the alternatives. If bankruptcy seems to be the only option, filers should thoroughly understand the consequences of the process before committing to that course of action.

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This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to offer legal advice or promote any certain plans or strategies that may be available to you. Always seek the advice of a financial professional, accountant, attorney, and/or tax expert to discuss your options.

[i] https://www.uscourts.gov/services-forms/bankruptcy
[ii] https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/what-is-the-difference-between-chapter-7-chapter-13-bankrutpcy.html
[iii] https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0224-filing-bankruptcy-what-know#counseling
[iv] https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/bankruptcy-filing-fees-costs.html
[v] https://www.experian.com/blogs/ask-experian/removing-bankruptcy-from-your-credit-report/
[vi] https://www.moneycrashers.com/bankruptcy-affect-credit-score/

More financial tips for the new year

January 7, 2019

More financial tips for the new year

There’s nothing like the start of a brand new year to put you in a resolution-making, goal-setting, slate-cleaning kind of mood.

Along with your commitment to eat less sugar and exercise a little more, carve out some time to set a few financial aspirations for the new year. Here are some quick tips that may add up to significant benefits for you and your family.

Check your credit report
Start the new year with a copy of your credit report. Every consumer is entitled to one free credit report per year. Make it a point to get yours. Your credit report determines your credit score, so an improved score may help you get a better interest rate on an auto loan or a better plan for utilities or your phone.

Check your credit report carefully for accuracy. If you find anything that shouldn’t be there, you can file a dispute to have it removed. There are several sites where you can get your free credit report – just don’t get duped into paying for it.

Up your 401(k) contributions
The start of a new year is a great time to review your retirement strategy and up your 401(k) contributions. If saving for retirement is on your radar right now – as it should be – see if it works in your budget to increase your 401(k) contribution a few percentage points.

Review your health insurance policy
The open enrollment period for your health insurance may occur later in the year, so make a note on your calendar now to explore your health insurance options beforehand. If you have employer-sponsored health insurance, they should give you information about your plan choices as the renewal approaches. If you provide your own health insurance, you may need to talk to your representative or the health insurance company directly to assess your coverage and check how you might be able to save with a different plan.

Make sure your coverage is serving you well. If you have a high deductible plan, see if you can set up a health savings account. An HSA will allow you to put aside pretax earnings for covered health care costs throughout the year.

No spend days
Consider implementing “no spend days” into your year. Select one day per month (or two if you’re brave) and make it a no spend day. This only works well if you make it non-negotiable! A no spend day means no spur of the moment happy hours, going out to lunch, or engaging in so-called retail therapy.

A no spend day may help you save a little money, but the real gift is what you may learn about your spending habits.

Do some financial goal setting
Whether we really stick to them or not, many of us might be pretty good at setting career goals, family goals, and health and fitness goals. But when it comes to formulating financial goals, some of us might not be so great at that. Still, financial goal setting is essential, because just like anything else, you can’t get there if you’re not sure where you’re going.

Start your financial goal setting by knowing where you want to go. Have some debt you want to pay off? Looking to own a home? Want to retire in the next ten years? Those are great financial goals, but you’ll need a solid strategy to get there.

If you’re having trouble creating a financial strategy, consider working with a qualified financial professional. They can help you draw your financial roadmap.

Clean out your financial closet
Financial tools like budgets, savings strategies, and household expenses need to be revisited. Think of your finances like a closet that should be cleaned out at least once a year. Open it up and take everything out, get rid of what’s no longer serving you, and organize what’s left.

Review your household budget
Take a good look at your household budget. Remember, a budget should be updated as your life changes, so the beginning of a new year is an excellent time to review it. Don’t have a budget? An excellent goal would be to create one! A budget is one of the most useful financial tools available. It’s like an x-ray that reveals your income and spending habits so you can see and track changes over time.

Make this year your financial year
A new year is a great time to do a little financial soul searching. Freshen up your finances, revisit your financial strategies, and greet the new year on solid financial footing.

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This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to promote any certain products, plans, or strategies for saving and/or investing that may be available to you. Before investing or enacting a savings or retirement strategy, seek the advice of a financial professional, accountant, health insurance representative, and/or tax expert to discuss your options.

How to Build Credit When You’re Young

June 25, 2018

How to Build Credit When You’re Young

Your credit score can affect a lot more than just your interest rates or credit limits.

Your credit history can have an impact on your eligibility for rental leases, raise (or lower) your auto insurance rates, or even affect your eligibility for certain jobs (although in many cases the authorized credit reports available to third parties don’t contain your credit score if you aren’t requesting credit). Because credit history affects so many aspects of financial life, it’s important to begin building a solid credit history as early as possible.

So, where do you start?

  1. Apply for a store credit card.
    Store credit cards are a common starting point for teens and young adults, as it often can be easier to get approved for a store card than for a major credit card. As a caveat though, store card interest rates are often higher than for a standard credit card. Credit limits are also typically low – but that might not be a bad thing when you’re just getting started building your credit. A lower limit helps ensure you’ll be able to keep up with payments. Because you’re trying to build a positive history and because interest rates are often higher with a store card, it’s important to pay on time – or ideally, to pay the entire balance when you receive the statement.

  2. Become an authorized user on a parent’s credit card.
    Another common way to begin building credit is to become an authorized user on a parent’s credit card. Ultimately, the credit card account isn’t yours, so your parents would be responsible for paying the balance. (Because of this, your credit score won’t benefit as much as if you are approved for a credit card in your own name.) Another thing to keep in mind is that some credit card providers don’t report authorized users’ activity to credit bureaus. Additionally, even if you’re only an authorized user, any missed or late payments on the card can affect your credit history negatively.

Are secured cards useful to build credit?
A secured credit card is another way to begin building credit. To secure the card, you make an initial deposit. The amount of that deposit is your credit line. If you miss a payment, the bank uses your collateral – the deposit – to pay the balance. Don’t let that make you too comfortable though. Your goal is to build a positive credit history, so if you miss payments – even though you have a prepaid deposit to fall back on – you’re still going to get a ding on your credit history. Instead, it’s best to use a small amount of your available credit each month and to pay in full when you get the statement. This will help you look like a credit superstar due to your consistently timely payments and low credit utilization.

As you build your credit history, you’ll be able to apply for credit in larger amounts, and you may even start receiving pre-approved offers. But beware. Having credit available is useful for certain emergencies and for demonstrating responsible use of credit – but you don’t need to apply for every offer you receive.

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The Advantages of Paying with Cash

The Advantages of Paying with Cash

We’re using debit cards to pay for expenses more often now, a trend that seems unlikely to reverse soon.

Debit cards are convenient. Just swipe and go. Even more so for their mobile phone equivalents: Apple Pay, Android Pay, and Samsung Pay. We like fast, we like easy, and we like a good sale. But are we actually spending more by not using cash like we did in the good old days?

Studies say yes. We spend more when using plastic – and that’s true of both credit card spending and debit card spending. Money is more easily spent with cards because you don’t “feel” it immediately. An extra $2 here, another $10 there… It adds up.

The phenomenon of reduced spending when paying with cash is a psychological “pain of payment.” Opening up your wallet at the register for a $20.00 purchase but only seeing a $10 bill in there – ouch! Maybe you’ll put back a couple of those $5 DVDs you just had to have 5 minutes ago.

When using plastic, the reality of the expense doesn’t sink in until the statement arrives. And even then it may not carry the same weight. After all, you only need to make the minimum payment, right? With cash, we’re more cautious – and that’s not a bad thing.

Try an experiment for a week: pay only with cash. When you pay with cash, the expense feels real – even when it might be relatively small. Hopefully, you’ll get a sense that you’re parting with something of value in exchange for something else. You might start to ask yourself things like “Do I need this new comforter set that’s on sale – a really good sale – or, do I just want this new comforter set because it’s really cute (and it’s on sale)?” You might find yourself paying more attention to how much things cost when making purchases, and weighing that against your budget.

If you find that you have money left over at the end of the week (and you probably will because who likes to see nothing when they open their wallet), put the cash aside in an envelope and give it a label. You can call it anything you want, like “Movie Night,” for example.

As the weeks go on, you’re likely to amass a respectable amount of cash in your “rewards” fund. You might even be dreaming about what to do with that money now. You can buy something special. You can save it. You can invest it. The choice is yours. Well done on saving your hard-earned cash.

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