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June 23, 2021

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The Time Value of Money and College

April 14, 2021

The Time Value of Money and College

College is one of the most expensive things that you can spend your money on, but it might not always be a good investment.

College graduates make much more than high school graduates over their lifetimes.¹ Some people think this means going to college is worth the cost because they’ll be able to pay off the loans with their higher salaries after graduation. But as you’ll see in this article, there’s another critical factor you should consider before going off to school.

Which career path will empower you to start saving sooner? The longer your money can accrue compound interest, the more it can grow. Working an extra four years instead of attending school could result in retiring with more. Let’s consider two hypotheticals that illustrate this point…

Let’s say you land a job straight out of high school at age 18 earning $35,000 total annual salary. You’re able to save 15% of your income in an account where the interest is compounded monthly at 9%. Assuming you work until 67, or 49 years, and consistently save the same amount each month over that time period at the same interest rate, you would retire with almost $4 million!

What if instead you attend college and graduate after 4 years? You land a job that pays $60,000 annually and are able to save 15% of your income. If you also retire at 67 after 45 years of work, saving 15% every month, you’ll retire with $4.7 million. That’s almost $700,000 more than the non-graduate!

But what if student loans prevent you from saving for 5 years after graduation? You’d retire with $3 million. In this hypothetical scenario, losing 9 years of saving results in a college graduate actually retiring with less than someone who diligently works and saves right out of high school.

The takeaway isn’t that you shouldn’t attend college. It’s that you should carefully weigh the costs of higher education. Is there a career path you could take right out of high school that would have you saving right away? Will your degree land you deep in debt and behind the 8-ball for building wealth? Or do the benefits of the degree substantially outweigh the costs? Don’t attend a college just because it’s what your peers are doing. Consider your passions, weigh the benefits, and calculate the costs before you make your decision!

This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to promote any certain products, plans, or strategies for saving and/or investing that may be available to you. Market performance is based on many factors and cannot be predicted. Any examples used in this article are hypothetical. Before investing, enacting a savings or retirement strategy, or taking on any loans or debt, seek the advice of a licensed and qualified financial professional, accountant, and/or tax expert to discuss your options.

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“The College Payoff,” Georgetown University, https://cew.georgetown.edu/cew-reports/the-college-payoff/

Home Buying for Couples: A Starter Guide

April 12, 2021

Home Buying for Couples: A Starter Guide

Buying your first home is an exciting, yet daunting process.

You and your significant other already have a lot on your plate in planning this huge purchase—from deciding how much house you need to fitting it all into a budget. Read on for some tips that will help ease the process of buying a house as well as help you save money in the long run!

Evaluate your financial situation before you start house hunting. It’s important to know what kind of mortgage payment is feasible for the income in a household. You’ll also have to contend with hidden housing costs like property taxes, renovations, and repairs. Calculate your total income, and then subtract your current expenses. That’s how much you have at your disposal to handle the costs of homeownership.

Improve your credit score. If you’re a first-time homebuyer, your credit score is important—it can profoundly affect your ability to get approved for loans and mortgages! The higher that number goes up, the easier it may become to get approval from lenders. You can help yourself out by paying off any outstanding debt balances such as student loan payments, medical bills, and credit card debt before going house hunting.

Start saving for a downpayment. As a rule of thumb, you’ll want to put down at least 20% of the home’s purchase price. This can take years, especially if your budget is tight! However, it’s well worth it—you may avoid the hassle of paying private mortgage insurance (PMI), which can substantially add to your monthly housing payments. A sizeable downpayment can also lower your interest rate and reduce the size of your loan.¹

Decide how much house you need. This is a tough question to answer, but it’s crucial that both partners are united on this front. Otherwise, one partner might feel like a house doesn’t meet their needs. Sit down with your partner and discuss what exactly you desire out of your home. How many bedrooms will you need? Do you want a big yard or a small one? How close to work do you want to live? Hammer out the important details of what you want in a home before the shopping begins!

Decide on your budget. Knowing how much you can afford before shopping for a home will help narrow down the options. Typically, housing costs should account for no more than 30% of your budget. That includes your mortgage payment, repairs, HOA fees, and renovations. Spending more than 30% can endanger your financial wellness if your income ever decreases.

Buying a home can be an exciting time for couples. But it’s important to take the necessary steps before you start house hunting. Remember, you want your new home to be a source of joy, not financial stress! Do your homework, talk with your partner, and start saving!

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“Do you need to put 20 percent down on a house?,” Michele Lerner, HSH, Sep 2, 2018, https://www.hsh.com/first-time-homebuyer/down-payment-size.html

The Power of Living Benefits

The Power of Living Benefits

Preparing for the possibility of a critical medical illness or condition is probably not high on your list of fun things to do.

But its importance cannot be overstated—two-thirds of people who file for bankruptcy do so because of medical debt.¹

What many don’t know, however, is that life insurance can help you shoulder the high cost of medical care… if you utilize living benefits!

How living benefits work <br> Almost all life insurance policies come with a death benefit. It’s money that will go to your beneficiaries when you pass away. A living benefit is a feature of some life insurance policies that allows you to access the death benefit while you’re still alive.

So let’s say you have a life insurance policy with a $400,000 death benefit. You suddenly get diagnosed with a serious illness that requires you to take time off work and undergo intensive medical treatment.

That means you’re facing a substantial expense with a decreased income. Your medical crisis has also become a financial crisis!

But what if you could access your death benefit in the present? $400,000 may cover a substantial portion—perhaps even all—of the cost of treatment.

And you don’t have to use your entire benefit. If your medical bills add up to $100,000, you could use $100,000 from your life insurance policy to cover your expenses, and leave the remaining $300,000 as the death benefit!

Keep in mind that only certain types of illness may trigger your ability to access your benefit. That’s why it’s important to work with a licensed and qualified financial professional to create the right policy for you.

If you’re interested in what living benefits would look like for you, contact me. We can review your income and how much life insurance your family needs!

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¹ “This is the real reason most Americans file for bankruptcy,” Lorie Konish, CNBC, Feb 11 2019, https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/11/this-is-the-real-reason-most-americans-file-for-bankruptcy.html

Why Gold Is More Than Just a Shiny Metal

April 5, 2021

Why Gold Is More Than Just a Shiny Metal

Gold has been a symbol of wealth and status since the dawn of time.

In ancient times, kings would have gold coins minted with their faces on them so that they could be exchanged for goods. Today, gold is commonly viewed as an investment. But… why? This post will explore how gold may help you achieve financial security for your family during today’s difficult economic times.

Gold is a valuable resource because it is rare—but not too rare! There’s a fine line between rare and too rare when it comes to currency. Some materials don’t have high value because they’re too common. That may seem obvious. But other materials are too rare—it would be almost impossible to widely circulate coins made out of platinum or rubies because they’re too difficult to find.

Gold strikes that perfect balance. It’s common enough to create a steady money supply, but rare enough to hold value.

Gold has value because it doesn’t corrode. Other metals like iron and copper eventually will corrode. That attribute won’t do for a currency—the treasury of a state would slowly decay into nothing!

Gold is excellent for storing value because it lasts. Gold jewelry, bars, and coins are far more likely to be in good shape in 100 years from now than other metals.

Gold has value because… well, because it’s always had value! Let’s face it—gold has been worth so much to so many people for a long time. They’ve used it to create beautiful jewelry, altars, decorations, and anything else that communicates luxury. It’s been the basic means of exchange for countless societies, civilizations, and empires throughout history. It’s the default, the original, the classic. And because it’s been considered valuable for most of human history, it’s a fair bet that it will continue to be valuable into the future.

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Leadership: 4 Ways to Inspire and Engage

Leadership: 4 Ways to Inspire and Engage

Leaders are often the ones who both create and maintain a positive work environment.

But that’s far easier said than done. It can feel like the success of your entire team falls squarely on your shoulders. That can create stress. Lots of it. And that can make it difficult to create a positive atmosphere in your workspace.

But there are some simple practices that can help foster a healthy and happy work environment. Here are a few!

Be an active listener. Don’t just hear what someone says. Focus, engage, and show interest in what is being said while asking questions. Showing that you’re listening will make others feel better about themselves and force you to take more seriously what they’re saying. It helps you get to know people on a deeper level—you’ll know exactly how best to talk with someone during your next interaction!

Ask your team for input. Your team is made up of people with many backgrounds and ideas. That’s why you need to make it a practice to ask your teammates or friends for input when coming up with a new idea. You won’t just discover possibilities that you had never thought of—workers will feel like they’re truly integrated into the team when you get their perspectives.

Give credit where it’s due. When you see an employee doing a great job, speak up! Recognize their work and let them know they’re appreciated. It will inspire the team and motivate your employees to keep striving for excellence.

Be mindful of your mood. Mindfulness is a difficult skill to master—but it can yield big results! Being aware of how you are feeling and being present in the moment is always beneficial. This one may not be easy, but with practice, mindfulness can help you respond wisely to difficult situations when they arise. Instead of getting lost in emotion-driven reactions, try monitoring your mental state and notice when you’re feeling tense—this will empower you to take productive action instead of giving way to more stress. It’s a critical ability that all leaders should invest in!

These tips aren’t just for CEOs or managers. Anyone can develop these skills and start to make their work environment a more positive place. They might be the edge you need to make difference in your company and stand out from the crowd.

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Personal Finance Moves For Small Business Owners

Personal Finance Moves For Small Business Owners

As a small business owner, you’re responsible for everything—from saving on office supplies to making sure folks get paid to knowing what taxes to file and when.

A big part of success is educating yourself on how your personal finances affect your business and vice versa. Here are a few moves that can help keep your personal finances healthy while you grow your business.

Keep track of your monthly income and expenses. Your business income can vary dramatically from month to month, depending on the season, number of sales, trends in your market, etc. These could potentially cause your average bottom line to be lower than anticipated.

That’s why it’s critical to track your monthly income and then budget accordingly. As your income grows and shrinks, you can adjust your spending.

Set up an emergency fund. This money can be used to cover unexpected costs, such as unanticipated repairs or an illness. But, when you own a business, it can also help you make ends meet if business is slow or, say, if a global pandemic shuts down the world economy. Save up 6 months’ worth of spending in an account you can easily access in a pinch!

Know what you owe, to whom, and when it is due. Personal debt can be a serious challenge for small business owners. It may motivate them to make foolish financial decisions to pay off what they owe, regardless of the consequences.

That’s why it’s important to manage your finances responsibly so that debt doesn’t become a problem. Adopt a debt management strategy to reduce your debt ASAP. Your business may benefit greatly from it.

Get professional advice if you need help with your finances. If it’s at all feasible for your business’s budget, get a professional set of eyes on your books. They’ll help you navigate the world of finances, share strategies that can help make the most of your revenue, and show you how to position yourself for future success!

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Tips For Saving Money At The Grocery Store

March 24, 2021

Tips For Saving Money At The Grocery Store

Every penny counts, especially when you’re trying to balance your monthly budget.

But unless you plan ahead and only buy things you need, it’s easy to overspend at the grocery store. If you keep these tips in mind when you’re shopping, you can save money without sacrificing quality.

Bring a list of what you need to buy. Why? Because a list keeps you on task. You’ll be far less likely to wander the store, spying things you don’t need and snapping them up, if you go with a clear plan of what you need to buy. Make a list, check it twice, and shop with a purpose!

Buy in bulk when it makes sense for your family size and lifestyle. If you have a big family, buying in bulk can save you big money, especially if items are on sale! But don’t just buy anything that seems like a good deal—only buy what your family will consume, and be sure to store it properly. That means non-perishable food items, hygiene and cleaning products, and home supplies.

Compare the unit price. A low sticker price doesn’t always indicate it’s the best buy. Always check the unit price to maximize your savings. The cheaper it is per ounce, pound, or unit, the better bargain it probably will be!

Use coupons and sales flyers when available. It’s simple—just download your favorite store’s app and look for the savings or coupon page. All you have to do is tap the items that you want to save on. Then, just scan your phone when you check out and watch the savings!

Rack up loyalty points when possible. Afterall, why shouldn’t you be rewarded for your usual shopping? Just scan your card every time you shop, and eventually you can earn free or discounted items. However, be careful that you don’t increase your spending to maximize your rewards!

Why not try one of these tips for just a month and see how much you save? It’s a worthwhile experiment that may result in a substantial boost in your cash flow. Let me know how it goes!

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How to Manage High Costs of Living

March 22, 2021

How to Manage High Costs of Living

It’s no secret that living in a larger city can be more expensive than in other areas.

Depending on where you live, the cost of buying groceries, public transportation, and even rent can vary drastically! If you want to learn how to manage your finances when living in an area with a higher cost of living, read on…

Lower your housing costs. Keeping a roof over your head is probably your number one expense, especially if you live in a major city. The most straightforward way to free up cash flow, then, is to downsize your apartment or home size.

While that sounds simple, it’s not always easy, particularly if you own a house! But if your budget is too tight and it’s at all possible, moving to a cheaper home or apartment can be the single most effective way to cut your spending and increase your cash flow.

Consider moving to a cheaper area. To find less costly housing, you may choose to relocate to a new neighborhood. But be sure to keep tabs on the price of daily expenses like groceries or increased transportation costs in your new stomping grounds—just because housing is cheaper doesn’t mean everything else will be!

Take on a second job, like freelancing, dog walking, or babysitting. Fortunately, living in a high cost of living area might mean you have access to plenty of part-time or side work. Check out sites like Upwork, and leverage your social networks to find viable gigs.

If you live in an area that’s high cost and has poor employment opportunities, you may need to consider relocating entirely.

Trim your budget. Try using a free budgeting app like Mint or PocketGuard for this one! They’re easy-to-use tools that can help you identify problematic spending patterns. Once you know where you’re wasting money, you can develop a strategy for cutting costs.

Coping with a high cost of living can be challenging, especially if you love the lifestyle of a big city or your work requires you to live in a certain area. Using these strategies can help reduce the burden of living in an expensive neighborhood. Which one would be easiest for you to apply to your financial life?

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What You Need to Know About NFTs

March 17, 2021

What You Need to Know About NFTs

Are you sitting down? Because some memes are officially worth money. Lots of money.

And it’s not just memes. Digital art has exploded in value recently, leading some to scratch their heads and others to jump on the bandwagon.

Here’s how Non-Fungible Tokens, or NFTs, work, and why you should care!

At their core, NFTs are simple pieces of digital art. They range from illustrated portraits of punks to “CryptoKitties” to the influencer equivalent of Pokémon cards—vlogger Logan Paul made $5 million in a weekend by selling one-of-a-kind trading cards featuring animated versions of himself.¹

Think of an NFT as a combination of a bitcoin and a trading card. They exist digitally and are sold online, but their value is totally dependent on being originals!

Each one has a unique blockchain ID, making them impossible to duplicate or forge. You can know beyond the shadow of a doubt that the digital artwork you’re buying is the real thing.

That makes every NFT a rare one-of-a-kind. And limited supply cranks up demand.

Where did NFTs come from? They started in niche internet subcultures. But they’ve made their way closer to the mainstream. Some people have even started viewing them as investment items. It’s easy to see why—a CryptoPunk drawing recently sold for $69 million.² There’s always a (very very small) chance that the simple NFT you buy today could be a rare collector’s item in 5 years. But it could also plummet in value the day after you buy.

Realize that the NFT market is uncharted territory. Predicting which NFT will be valuable is nearly impossible. There’s nothing wrong with dabbling in digital art here and there. But it’s best to stick with more stable and time-tested strategies if you’re aiming to grow long-term wealth!

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¹ “What Is An NFT—And Should You Buy One?,” Abram Brown, Forbes, Feb 26, 2021, https://www.forbes.com/sites/abrambrown/2021/02/26/what-is-an-nft-and-should-you-buy-one/?sh=7335a47824b2

² “Beeple NFT becomes most expensive ever sold at auction after fetching over $60 million,” Robert Frank, CNBC, Mar 11, 2021, https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/11/most-expensive-nft-ever-sold-auctions-for-over-60-million.html

What You Need To Know About Life Insurance

March 15, 2021

What You Need To Know About Life Insurance

Buying life insurance is something that many people put off.

But it’s important to take the time to learn about what type of policy you may need and how much coverage you should buy. If you have a family, buying enough life insurance might be the most important part of your financial strategy.

Here are 4 things you need to know before you buy life insurance.

What is life insurance? Simply put, life insurance is an agreement between an insurer and a policyholder. When the policyholder dies, the insurer is legally obligated to pay a set amount of money, called a death benefit, to whomever the policyholder had predetermined.

Do you need life insurance? If people you love are dependent on your income, you may need life insurance. The death benefit can serve as a replacement for income that would vanish in the case of your passing. A personal tragedy doesn’t have to become a financial crisis!

What if I don’t have any dependents? Then life insurance may not be for you! However, you should note that life insurance might be useful if you’re carrying high levels of debt like student loans or a mortgage.

How much coverage should I get and how long should my policy last? As a rule of thumb, your life insurance coverage should be worth 10X your annual income. That should provide your family with a financial cushion while they grieve and plan for the future.

If you buy a term policy, be sure that it lasts through periods of high financial responsibility like paying a mortgage or raising a family.

If you want to learn more about life insurance, let me know! I can help you evaluate your financial situation and what a policy would look like for you.

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This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to promote any certain products, plans, or policies that may be available to you. Any examples used in this article are hypothetical. Before enacting a savings or retirement strategy, or purchasing a life insurance policy, seek the advice of a licensed and qualified financial professional, accountant, and/or tax expert to discuss your options.

How to Reduce Debt

March 10, 2021

How to Reduce Debt

Paying off debt can be a great feeling.

The burden is lifted and you have more control over your financial situation. If you’re like many, however, paying down debt hasn’t been an easy task due to high interest rates and the sheer size of what you owe. Many people find themselves in situations where they feel helpless. But following some tips from this article can show you a path towards financial health!

Start by making a budget. Write down your income on a piece of paper or spreadsheet. Then, calculate how much you spend, on average, every month. If you can, categorize all of your expenses in order of amount spent. Be sure to also rank your debts from highest to lowest interest rate!

Then, subtract your expenses from your income. The result is how much cash flow you have available to attack your debt.

But before you start chipping away at what you owe, devote your cash flow to building an emergency fund. Why? Because it will provide a cash reserve to pay for unexpected expenses that you might otherwise cover with more debt!

Then, focus all your financial resources on your highest interest loan. Make minimum payments on all your debts until that top priority debt is eliminated. Next, move on to the next debt. Rinse and repeat until you’re debt free.

Track your spending and cut back where possible. When you budget, you might find that you have almost no cash flow. If that’s the case, you’ll need to reduce your spending. Start by cutting back on categories like clothes shopping and dining out.

Above all, be consistent! Reducing debt is no easy task but it’s doable. Cutting back on your spending and consistently budgeting may not be easy in the short-term, but the sense of relief that comes with being debt free is well worth the effort.

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What to Do If You Can't Pay Your Bills

March 8, 2021

What to Do If You Can't Pay Your Bills

If you’re having a hard time paying your bills, there are two strategies that might help you find relief.

A financial professional can help you decide which one works best for you, but here’s what we know about each approach…

Contact everyone you owe. You don’t need to worry about getting punished for asking a creditor if they’re willing to negotiate. Even if they say no, you still gain the satisfaction of knowing you tried. Doesn’t it make sense that a landlord would want their tenant to pay more than nothing? Or credit card companies would want some level of payment over none at all? It’s worth giving it a shot!

Write a letter explaining your situation. Detail why you’re not able to make payments, state how much you can pay instead, when you believe you’ll start making regular payments, and list your income and assets. You might be surprised by how effective your request for relief actually could be!

Work with a debt counselor. Debt counselors can feel like a life-saving resource if you’re drowning in debt and unable to manage your finances. They can help you understand your credit report, help you negotiate with creditors, and offer advice on how to pay off your debts.

However, verify that the debt counseling agency you work with is properly qualified to help you. Here’s how…

■ Find your counselor through the Financial Counseling Association of America or the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. ■ Ask what services they provide for free. Be cautious if they charge for workshops or if they immediately recommend a debt management program. ■ Check their standing with the Better Business Bureau.

Finally, check out the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s website to learn more. They have educational resources, links to useful services, and even templates for appeal and complaint letters.

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Tips to Combat Burnout

March 3, 2021

Tips to Combat Burnout

Does work have you down? Do you feel so constantly overwhelmed by deadlines or conflict that you’ve started to emotionally withdraw?

Then you might be facing burnout. It’s a condition that results in uncertainty and stress in a work environment or position. All of that pressure can result in excessive cynicism, poor performance, and a lack of energy.

If any of those sound like you or a loved one, read on for some simple tips and strategies that can help combat burnout.

Seek support and help. If you’re feeling overwhelmed by workplace stress, let someone know! Talking to someone about your feelings is always a wise move. Your friends and colleagues may be more likely to respond with trust and support than you anticipate. Consider also meeting with a qualified mental health professional to better understand your burnout and learn healthy coping mechanisms.

Exercise. If you’re physically able, schedule a daily or weekly workout into your regular routine. Why? Because there’s no simpler way to combat burnout than regular exercise. It’s been proven to combat anxiety, alleviate depression, and increase positive emotions.¹

Don’t be too hard on yourself at first—it may be challenging to motivate yourself if you’re combatting intense burnout. But try an exercise routine for a few weeks and then see how you feel. You may be surprised by the difference it makes!

Make a change. What’s something that causes you consistent stress that you can handle differently? If you’re burned out, it’s a serious indication that something must change. Simply “trying harder” or “toughening up” may lead to more frustration and emotional withdrawal.

Be honest with yourself. Are there changes you need to make in your mindset or do you need to seek a new job? What can you do differently when faced with chaos or urgent deadlines? Don’t settle for making the same mistake over and over. Identify a cause of stress, and tackle it from a new angle!

As said earlier, don’t be afraid to seek professional help if you’re facing serious burnout symptoms. These tips may help you combat burnout. But if they aren’t enough, working with a mental health expert may be what you need to recover and find peace of mind.

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¹ “Exercise for Mental Health,” Ashish Sharma, M.D., Vishal Madaan, M.D., and Frederick D. Petty, M.D., Ph.D., Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 2006, 3https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470658/#:~:text=Exercise%20improves%20mental%20health%20by,self%2Desteem%20and%20cognitive%20function.&text=Exercise%20has%20also%20been%20found,self%2Desteem%20and%20social%20withdrawal.

How to Find Your Net Worth

March 1, 2021

How to Find Your Net Worth

Usually when we think of net worth we imagine all the holdings of a wealthy tycoon who owns several multi-million dollar businesses.

Net worth is just a balance sheet of a person’s assets and liabilities, not unlike the balance sheets used in business. You also have a net worth, and it’s important to know what it is.

Calculating your net worth is simple. First, you’ll want to tally up all your assets. These would include:

  • Personal property and cars
  • Real estate equity
  • Investments
  • Vested retirement plans
  • Cash or savings
  • Any amounts owed to you
  • Cash value of life insurance policies

Next, you’ll calculate your liabilities (what you owe someone else). These would include:

  • Loans
  • Mortgage balance
  • Credit card balances
  • Unpaid obligations

Your total liabilities subtracted from your total assets equals your net worth.

The number could be positive, or it could be negative. Students, for example, often have a negative net worth because they may have student loans but haven’t had a chance to build any personal assets.

It’s important to realize that net worth isn’t always equal to liquid assets. Your net worth includes non-liquid assets, like the equity in your home.

Measuring your net worth regularly can be a strong motivation when saving for the future—it can mark progress toward a well-reasoned financial goal.

When you’re ready to put together a personalized strategy based on your net worth and (more importantly) your future goals, reach out! We can use your current net worth as a starting point, while keeping focused on the real target: your long-term financial picture.

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2 Strategies to Build Credit When You’re Young

February 24, 2021

2 Strategies to Build Credit When You’re Young

The sooner you establish your credit score, the better positioned you’ll be for financial success.

Why? Because your credit score touches every aspect of your financial life—a high score can help you obtain a lower interest rate on mortgages and car loans, insurance payments, and even your rent!¹ That can help free up more cash for building wealth.

So, where do you start?

Apply for a credit card… and then use it responsibly! Credit cards are excellent tools for building your credit history. If you attend a university, you might be able to score a student credit card. However, just remember that credit cards are not free money. The less you use your credit card, the higher your credit score. Choose a few recurring expenses, and limit your credit card usage to those. Then make sure you pay off the balance every month, on time.

Use automatic payments on all your debts. Missing payments on your debt obligations can torpedo your credit score. It’s absolutely critical to pay on time for your credit card bill, student loan payments, and anything else you owe.

Consider automating all of your debt payments. It’s a simple, one-time move that can steadily reduce your balances and help boost your credit score.

As you build your credit history, you’ll be able to apply for credit in larger amounts, and you may even start receiving pre-approved offers. But beware. Having credit available is useful for certain emergencies and for demonstrating responsible use of credit—but you don’t need to apply for every offer you receive!

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What Are The Odds of Winning the Lottery?

February 22, 2021

What Are The Odds of Winning the Lottery?

Your odds of winning the Powerball are 1 in 292.2 million. For Mega Millions, your odds are 1 in 302.5 million.¹

Translation—you almost certainly will not win the lottery.

You have a greater chance of being killed by lightning (1 in 2 million), having a fatal encounter with a venomous plant or animal (1 in 3.4 million), or being crushed by a falling plane (1 in 10 million).²

The worst part? Playing more doesn’t improve your chances of winning. The probability of drawing the lucky numbers resets every time you buy a scratch-off or choose your “lucky number.” You’re throwing money at a tiny moving target that you’re almost guaranteed to miss.

If you do like to purchase lottery tickets for entertainment—try to keep it to just that. Make sure you budget in ticket purchases with other fun-related activities, and if you do reap some winnings, make sure you have a strategy for saving a portion towards your financial goals.

Buying lottery tickets is generally an unproductive activity. If left unchecked, it can turn into a money blackhole that will almost certainly never pay off. You work too hard for your paycheck to waste it on what amounts to impossible odds.

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¹ “What Are the Odds of Winning the Lottery?,” Kimberly Amadeo, The Balance, Nov 4, 2020, https://www.thebalance.com/what-are-the-odds-of-winning-the-lottery-3306232

² “The Lottery: Is It Ever Worth Playing?,” Investopedia, Jan 29, 2021, https://www.investopedia.com/managing-wealth/worth-playing-lottery/

Spend Less or Earn More?

February 17, 2021

Spend Less or Earn More?

What’s the most effective way to meet your financial goals—increasing your income or cutting your spending?

The answer? It depends on your situation. While both strategies can be useful, they’re not interchangeable. Read on to discover the advantages and limitations of each approach… and which one may be right for you.

Spending less: An immediate solution with a fixed floor. There’s no doubt that cutting expenses is the fastest way to move closer to your financial goals. Canceling a streaming service, clipping digital coupons on your phone, and carpooling are simple lifestyle adjustments that take only seconds or minutes to accomplish.

But stricter budgeting can only go so far. Moving back in with your parents, walking to work, and never having fun again may still not be enough. There’s only so much you can cut before you seriously decrease your quality of life!

Earning more: High effort, massive potential. On the surface, increasing your income can seem like a daunting task. Developing your skills, working an extra job and starting a side hustle or business can be labor and time intensive. Furthermore, some of those investments may not pay off immediately—a business or side gig may not generate significant income for weeks, months, or even years!

But those investments also have massive payoff potential. Once you’ve mastered a skill, your earning power is only limited by the market demand for your abilities and your time. And as you grow more and more competent, your potential to earn only increases.

The takeaway? Spending less is a quick and simple move towards your financial goals. But, over the long-term, earning more has far more potential to create the wealth you desire. If you need to quickly increase your cash flow, create a budget and reduce your excess spending. But when your financial situation stabilizes, take inventory of your skills. You might be surprised by how many money earning talents you have, if you take the time to cultivate them!

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3 Things to Remember When Asking for a Raise

February 15, 2021

3 Things to Remember When Asking for a Raise

Are you ready to earn more money?

Don’t let fear of asking for more hold you back! Here are 3 simple things to remember when asking for a raise that can elevate your pitch and improve your odds of success.

Be straightforward. Don’t beat around the bush—tell your boss that you think you deserve a higher salary! Higher-ups won’t be blindsided or angered by the request, so long as you frame it respectfully and you don’t ask for an outrageous income boost.

Demonstrate your value. There are two ways to demonstrate your value to your employer. The first is simple—point out the great work you’ve done over the past year. What projects have you crushed, when have you shown initiative, and how have your skills grown? Make a list of your accomplishments and be prepared to share them with your boss.

The second is to research your position. What are other workers in your role and industry earning? Even better, what do they earn in your city and at your experience level? That’s the ballpark raise you should ask for, if it’s applicable.

Ask at a strategic time. Did your manager wake up on the wrong side of the bed this morning? Probably today is not a good day to ask for a raise in that case. But are you both celebrating a significant professional win? You might have better luck!

It’s not about just timing your request with your boss’s mood. Consider asking either during your annual performance review or while your company is making financial plans for the upcoming year. Your higher-ups might be more inclined to reward your work if they observe your accomplishments laid out logically or see that they have cash available in the new year.

Don’t get discouraged if you hear a ‘no.’ If they give you performance related reasons, take note and implement their suggestions. Your company may simply not have enough cash on hand currently to give you anything more. Continue to deliver results, and ask again later!

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How to Save for Large Purchases

February 10, 2021

How to Save for Large Purchases

So you’re saving for retirement. Good for you!

You’re further in the game than a lot of people. But retirement’s probably not your only financial priority that requires saving for. Buying a house, raising children, buying cars for your children, and paying for college for your children are just a few expenses you can expect along the way. Preparing for those purchases now can protect your finances from getting blindsided when the time comes. Here are a few steps you can take to start preparing for substantial purchases today.

Write down upcoming expenses and purchases. Make a timeline of all your major, non-regular expenses. Determine how much they could cost, and then rank them in terms of urgency and importance. If it’s urgent and important–like saving for the delivery of a newborn–address it as soon as possible. If it’s important, but less urgent–like toddler-proofing your home–schedule it for later.

Budget out how much you’ll need and start saving. Once you have your priorities straightened out, figure out how much you’ll need to have saved and how much time you have available. Then, set up automatic deposits that put aside money for your savings goals.

Seek higher interest rates. Saving for your purchases in accounts with higher interest rates can give your money the extra juice you need to crush your goals. That may mean opening a high interest savings account with an online bank. But for some items, you might be able to find accounts specifically designed to help you. Meet with a licensed and qualified financial professional and see what options you have available!

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3 Steps to Reduce Debt with Limited Income

February 8, 2021

3 Steps to Reduce Debt with Limited Income

Is your income holding you back from paying down debt?

It may feel like necessities such as housing, groceries, and transportation are consuming your cash flow. So how can you pay down debt if you feel like you’re struggling to put food on the table?

Reducing debt with a limited income is certainly a challenge. But if you know the right strategies, it’s an obstacle that you can work to overcome. Read on for tips that can help you pay down debt, regardless of how much you earn.

Budget debt payments first. The next time you sit down to budget, start by allocating money for reducing your debt. It should be your number one priority. Then, budget for essential living expenses like housing, utilities, and groceries. If you need more cash flow, cut down on non-essential spending like dining out and purchasing new clothes.

Start a side gig. If cutting expenses alone doesn’t free up enough cash, explore ways to make more money. That doesn’t always mean starting a second job—after all, this is the golden age of side gigs! Here are just a few hustle ideas for your consideration…

■ Resell books, clothes, and shoes you might pick up from the thrift store on eBay ■ Rideshare or deliver groceries and food ■ House sit, baby sit, or pet sit for friends and neighbors

Ultimately, your ability to earn income is only limited by your creativity in solving problems. What other opportunities are there for you to help others and earn extra income?

Make more than minimum payments. Your debt will linger if you make only minimum payments. That’s because minimum payments are nearly erased by interest. You make a payment, but the interest may put you almost right back where you started.

Instead, choose one debt to eliminate at a time. You should start with the one with the smallest total balance or the highest interest rate. Keep making the minimum payments on your other debts, and target that one debt with the rest of your available financial resources. Once it’s gone, choose the next smallest balance. Rinse and repeat until your debts are gone.

The biggest takeaway is that if you’re working with a limited income, paying off debt has to become your number one financial goal. Devote as much of your budget towards it as possible and increase your earnings if you have to. But it’s well worth the effort—once your debt is gone, you’ll have significantly more income for building real wealth!

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