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November 30, 2022

Money Black Holes You Should Avoid

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Money Black Holes You Should Avoid

November 30, 2022

Money Black Holes You Should Avoid

It’s true that sometimes you’ve got to spend money to make money.

But there are plenty of things that people spend money on that give them absolutely no return. Some of these are obvious (lottery tickets and ponzi schemes), but others are subtle parts of our lifestyle. Here are three money black holes that you should avoid at all costs!

New Cars

Nothing feels better than driving off the lot with a new set of wheels. Until, that is, you realize that your car’s value has already started plummeting.

The most important rule to remember is that cars are practical tools, not long-term investments. Blowing a huge stack of cash might feel cool, but it’s a huge misallocation of money if you don’t have any to spend. Try to find a used model of the same car that’s five years old or more. Chances are you’ll get many of the same features for a fraction of the cost.

Pricey Phones

It seems like phones are improving every day and in every way. But is your high-end, name brand personal assistant really worth the steep price tag? Phones always decline in value after you buy them—around -16.70% for iPhones and -33.62%.¹ Unless your mobile device is a tool of your trade (i.e., you’re a TikTok influencer), dodge the hype and choose a cheaper or refurbished alternative.

Designer Clothes

New threads are awesome. You’ll never feel more like a hero than when you first hit the town in a freshly fitted suit or a designer t-shirt.

They’re also insanely expensive. Sure, they might not all cost $1,195 like a Tom Ford long sleeve henley T-Shirt. But regularly buying top-of-the-line clothes can burn huge holes in your wallet.

Fortunately, you have some fun alternatives at your fingertips. Off-price retailers might sometimes carry your favorite brands at a fraction of the cost. And thrift stores can be goldmines of high quality finds if you’re adventurous enough to explore them with a friend!

Remember, it’s okay to spend money on cool gadgets and gear if you’ve saved up for them or you’re already financially independent. But if you’re just setting out on your journey, it’s best to practice some discipline and seek out cheaper alternatives to these potentially dangerous money black holes.

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¹ “2020-2021’s Phone Depreciation Report Best Vs. Worst: Devices, Brands & Operating Systems,” Ash Turner, BankMyCell, https://www.bankmycell.com/blog/cell-phone-depreciation-report-2020-2021/

4 Insights Into Paying Off Debt

November 28, 2022

4 Insights Into Paying Off Debt

On paper, paying off debt seems simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s always easy.

In fact, it can get downright discouraging if you don’t see any progress on your balances, especially if you feel like your finances are already stretched.

Fortunately, there are ways to take your debt escape plan to the next level. Here are a few insightful tips for anyone who feels like their wheels are spinning.

You must create a plan

Planning is one of the most important steps towards eliminating debt. Studies show that creating detailed plans increases our follow-through.¹ It also frees up our mental resources to focus on other pressing issues.²

Those are essential components of overcoming debt. A plan helps you stick to your guns when you’re tempted to make an impulse buy on your credit card or consider taking that last-minute weekend trip. And tackling problems that have nothing to do with debt can be a breath of fresh air for your mental health.

You have to stop borrowing

Seems obvious, right? But it might be easier said than done. Credit cards can seem like a convenient way to cover emergency expenses if you’re strapped for cash. Plus, spending money can feel therapeutic. Kicking the habit of borrowing to buy can be hard!

That’s why it’s so important to fortify your financial house with an emergency fund before you start eliminating debt. Save up enough money to cover 3 months of expenses. Then quit borrowing cold turkey. You should always have enough cash in reserve to cover car repairs and doctor visits without using your credit card.

Your lifestyle has to change

But, as mentioned before, debt can embed itself into lifestyles. You can’t get rid of debt without cutting back on spending, and you can’t cut back on spending without transforming your lifestyle.

When you’re making your escape plan, identify your highest spending categories. How important are they to your quality of life? Some of them might be essential. But you may realize that others exist just out of habit. Be willing to sacrifice some of your favorite activities, at least until you’re debt free.

You can still do the things you want

This does NOT mean that you have to be miserable. You can still enjoy a vacation, buy an awesome gadget, or treat your partner to a romantic dinner. You just have to prepare for those events differently.

Create a “fun fund” that you contribute money to every month. Budget a specific amount to put in it and dedicate it to a specific item. This allows you to have some fun every now and then without derailing your journey to financial freedom.

Debt doesn’t have to be overwhelming. These insights can help you stay the course as you eliminate debt from your financial house and start pursuing your dreams. Let me know if you’re interested in learning more about debt-destroying strategies!

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¹ “Making the Best Laid Plans Better: How Plan-Making Prompts Increase Follow-Through,” Todd Rogers, Katherine L. Milkman, Leslie K. John and Michael I. Norton, Behavioral Science and Policy, 2016, https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/todd_rogers/files/making_0.pdf

² “The Power of a Plan,” Timothy A Pychyl Ph.D., Psychology Today, Nov 17, 2011, https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/dont-delay/201111/the-power-plan

The Most Important Retirement Rule

November 23, 2022

The Most Important Retirement Rule

The best way to determine your retirement target savings is to use your income.

Here’s why.

Almost nobody wants to work 40 hours a week in retirement. Not you, not me. To avoid that, you must have money at your disposal to cover expenses like food, travel, and medical bills.

But how much do you need?

There’s a 38% chance that if you retire at 65 you will live to 85, and a 5% chance that you’ll make it to 95.¹ That means you’ll need enough cash to cover at least 20 years of life with no income.

This is where your paycheck comes into play.

Aiming to save 20 to 30 times your income helps prepare you to maintain your current lifestyle into retirement. You might even have extra spending money if you’re debt free!

Plus, it forces you to scale your savings as your income grows.

Setting a goal based solely on how much you want to spend in retirement can result in lowering your savings goal. You might splurge more now, telling yourself that you’ll just live on less later. But you’re cheating your future self!

Using your income as a retirement benchmark forces you to increase your savings amount as your paycheck grows. Let’s say you make $80,000 annually and you start saving. Your goal is to stash away 20 times your income, or about $1.6 million.

After a while, you’re able to save 5 years worth of earnings, or about $400,000.

But then you get a raise! Suddenly you’re making $100,000 per year. Your retirement target shifts up accordingly to $2 million. That $400,000 you have in the bank is a hefty slice of cash, but it’s now only worth 4 years of income instead of 5.

In other words, basing your saving around your income actually encourages you to save more as your income increases.

The best thing about this method is that it focuses on the most important part of retiring—to sustain the lifestyle that you envision. Meet with a licensed financial professional to map out what that would look like for you and how much you must save to make that vision a reality.

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¹ “How Long Will Your Retirement Really Last?,” Simon Moore, Forbes, Apr 24, 2018, https://www.forbes.com/sites/simonmoore/2018/04/24/how-long-will-your-retirement-last/?sh=31a59fb37472

Two Rules That Could Save Your Financial Life

November 21, 2022

Two Rules That Could Save Your Financial Life

Around 60% of Americans have less than $1,000 saved.¹

That means most Americans couldn’t cover unplanned car repairs, home maintenance, or medical bills without selling something or going into debt. They’re constantly living on the edge of financial ruin.

That’s where your emergency fund comes in. It’s a stash of cash that you can easily access in a pinch. You’ll be able to pay for that blown transmission without visiting a payday lender or selling your grandma’s silverware!

But here’s the catch: Your emergency savings account won’t help you much if it’s under-funded.

Follow these two rules to ensure that your rainy day savings can withstand the storms of life.

Rule #1: Only use your emergency fund for real emergencies.

I get it. Your emergency fund is an easily accessible chunk of money. Of course it’s going to be tempting to tap into it when you’re buying a new car or planning a dream vacation.

But your rainy day savings shouldn’t fund your lifestyle. They should protect it.

Think of it like this. Your vacation fund pays for your annual beach trip. Your emergency fund covers the bill when your car breaks down on the drive home. Only touch your emergency fund for unexpected expenses and enjoy the peace that comes from being prepared.

Rule #2: Always refill your emergency fund when it’s low

Ideally, your emergency fund should be stocked with 3 to 6 months of your income at all times. That should be enough to cover the gambit from small unexpected costs to a month or two of unemployment.

Don’t be afraid to tap into your emergency savings when you face unforeseen financial hiccups. Just remember to refresh your fund when the emergency has passed. The last thing you need is to be caught in the crosshairs of another crisis without a buffer.

Don’t let a financial storm blow you off course. Prepare for your future, and start building an emergency fund now. If you follow these rules, it can help financially protect you from the challenges life will inevitably send your way.

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¹ “Survey: Less than half of Americans have savings to cover a $1,000 surprise expense,” Karen Bennett, Bankrate, Jan 19, 2022, https://www.bankrate.com/banking/savings/financial-security-january-2022/#:~:text=Here’s%20an%20explanation%20for%20how,according%20to%20a%20Bankrate%20survey.

Is Your Home An Investment?

November 14, 2022

Is Your Home An Investment?

It’s a law of the universe that your house is an investment, right?

Just ask your grandparents who bought a $250,000 home for $50,000 during the 1950s. Better yet, listen to your savvy landlord buddy who rules an urban real estate empire that they gobbled up following the Great Recession. We’re surrounded by evidence that conclusively demonstrates the power of houses as investments… or are we?

Hmmm.

It turns out that buying a place of residence may not actually pay off in the long run like it might appear on paper. Here’s why you might want to rethink having your primary residence be an investment only.

Houses (usually) don’t actually grow more valuable

Think about that suburban mansion your grandparents snagged for $50,000 that eventually “grew” to be worth $250,000. On paper, that looks like an awesome investment; that house quintupled in value! But remember, $1 in 1950 had about the purchasing power of $10 today. Four gallons of gas or two movie tickets were just one buck!¹ That means $50,000 at that time could buy a $539,249 house today. Your grandparents actually lost money on that house, even though it looked like they made off like bandits!

It’s all because of one simple feature of economics and the word of the hour—inflation. Prices tend to rise over time, meaning that your dollar today doesn’t go as far as it would have in 1950. So while it looks like your grandparents netted a fortune on their house, they actually didn’t. They lost over half its value! Unless your neighborhood suddenly spikes in popularity with young professionals or you start renting, your house probably won’t accrue any real worth beyond inflation in this example.

Houses have to be maintained

But it’s not just that houses usually don’t actually appreciate in value. They also cost money in property taxes, utilities, and maintenance. Homeowners spend, on average, $3,192 annually to maintain their dwelling places.² You can expect to pay $13,200 annually on the average mortgage and $4,400 for utilities.³ ⁴ That comes out to a total of $17,600 per year on keeping the house and making it livable. Let’s say your home is worth about $230,000 and appreciates by 3.8% every year. It will grow in value by about $8,740 by the end of the year. That’s barely more than half of what it costs to keep the house up and running! Your house is hemorrhaging money, not turning a profit.

It’s important to note that homeownership can still be a good thing. It can protect you from coughing up all your money to a landlord. Buying a property in an up-and-coming neighborhood and renting it out can be a great way to supplement your income. Plus, there’s something special about owning a place and making it yours. But make no mistake; unless you strike real estate gold, your place of residence probably shouldn’t be (primarily) an investment. It can be home, but you might need to rely on it to help fund your retirement!

Market performance is based on many factors and cannot be predicted. This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to promote any certain products, plans, or strategies for saving and/or investing that may be available to you. Any examples used in this article are hypothetical. Before investing or enacting a savings, investment, or retirement strategy, seek the advice of a licensed financial professional, accountant, and/or tax expert to discuss your options.

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Market performance is based on many factors and cannot be predicted. This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to promote any certain products, plans, or strategies for saving and/or investing that may be available to you. Any examples used in this article are hypothetical. Before investing or enacting a savings, investment, or retirement strategy, seek the advice of a licensed financial professional, accountant, and/or tax expert to discuss your options.


¹ “7 Things You Could Buy For $1 in 1950,” Megan Elliott, Showbiz Cheatsheet, Oct 9, 2016, https://www.cheatsheet.com/money-career/things-you-could-buy-for-1-dollar.html/

² “Rule of Thumb: How Much To Budget for Home Maintenance,” Terri Williams, The Balance, March 8, 2022, https://www.thebalance.com/home-maintenance-budget-453820

³ “What Is The Average Mortgage Payment?”, Katie Ziraldo, Rocket Mortgage, Aug 25, 2022, https://www.rocketmortgage.com/learn/average-mortgage-payment

⁴ “Average Utilities Cost Per Month In US Homes,” Hanna Kielar Rocket HQ, Oct 28, 2021, https://www.rockethq.com/learn/personal-finances/average-cost-of-utilities

The Right Way to Spend

November 9, 2022

The Right Way to Spend

There’s endless advice about how not to spend money. And it’s often delivered with an undertone of shame.

“You’re spending WHAT on your one bedroom apartment? Why don’t you find roommates?”

“I’ll bet those lattes add up! That money could be going towards your retirement.”

“You still buy food? Dumpster diving is so much more thrifty!”

You get the picture.

But make no mistake—pruning back your budget is great IF overspending is stopping you from reaching your goals.

But what if you’re financially on target? What if your debt is gone, your family’s protected, your retirement accounts are compounding, your emergency fund is stocked, and you still have money to spare?

Good news—you don’t have to live like a broke college student. That’s not you anymore. Instead, you can spend money on the things you really care about, like…

• People you love

• Causes that inspire you

• Local businesses

• House cleaning services

• Travelling

• Building your dream house

• New skills and hobbies

This isn’t a call to wildly spend on everything that catches your momentary fancy. That might be symptomatic of underlying wounds that you’re trying to heal with money. It won’t work.

Instead, it’s a call to identify a few things that you’re truly passionate about. Ramit Sethi of I Will Teach You to Be Rich fame calls these Money Dials.¹ They’re things like convenience, travel, and self-improvement that excite you.

Just imagine you have limitless money. What would be the first thing you spend it on? That’s your money dial.

And, so long as you’re financially stable, there’s no shame in spending money on those things. This is why you’ve worked so hard and saved so much—to provide yourself and your loved ones with a better quality of life. Give yourself permission to enjoy that!

So what are you waiting for? Start planning that backpacking adventure through Scandinavia, or drafting blueprints for your dream house, or decking out the spare room as a recording studio. You’ve earned it!

Not positioned to spend on your passions yet? That’s okay! For now, let your goals inspire you to take the first steps towards creating financial independence and the lifestyle that can follow.

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¹ “Money Dials: The Reason You Spend the Way You Do According to Ramit Sethi,” Ramit Sethi, I Will Teach You To Be Rich, Oct 22, 2021, https://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com/blog/money-dials/

The Surprising Financial Benefit of Marriage

The Surprising Financial Benefit of Marriage

No, it’s NOT the tax break, although that’s helpful.

It’s not the extra income, though that can help you reach your financial goals.

It’s not even the health insurance perks, which may save you a massive chunk of cash.

It’s actually love. And that’s not hyperbole. It’s a fact.

A Harvard study spanning decades discovered that men who described their close relationships as warm earned vastly more than their peers.¹

Why? What’s the connection between healthy relationships and income?

Maybe it’s simply a correlation, not a causation. Perhaps there’s a hidden factor that leads to both high incomes and great marriages.

It’s certainly not intelligence. Past a certain point, warm relationships were better predictors of income than IQ.

Health might play a role. Happy marriages tend to boost longevity and increase physical well-being, the study found.

But it doesn’t take much thought to see potential connections between relationships and income.

For instance, the stress of an unhealthy relationship might make it harder to focus on work, impacting performance.

Or maybe the power of healthy teamwork exponentially increases a couple’s ability to excel in their fields.

Or maybe encouragement and acceptance empower people to take more calculated risks with big potential payoffs.

Or maybe, just maybe, healthy relationships give people something worth fighting for.

You be the judge. Regardless of the cause, it’s clear that your relationships are among the wisest investments you can make.

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¹ “What makes a good life? 3 Lessons on Life, Love, and Decision Making from the Harvard Grant Study,” Michael Miller, Six Seconds, https://www.6seconds.org/2021/04/19/harvard-grant-study/

Digital Nomadism: What You Need to Know

November 2, 2022

Digital Nomadism: What You Need to Know

Ever wish you could travel the world AND earn a living at the same darn time?

Of course! Building a digital income source under the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, in a cozy cabin in the Alps, or among majestic Sequoia trees sounds like a dream.

But it’s becoming a reality for many. Think about the travel influencers you follow, or your college friends sitting on a beach with their laptops enjoying a beer. They’re all digital nomads.

You’re not imagining things—digital nomadism has exploded since the COVID-19 pandemic first began, growing 49% from 2019 to 2020.¹

If you’re considering ditching the cubicle for the open road, here are a few key facts and figures you should know!

83% of digital nomads are self-employed.²

The majority of self-employed nomads are entrepreneurs (66%), while the remainder are freelancers (34%). It’s not impossible to work and travel while keeping your day job. But there’s a clear connection between the independence of the road and owning your own business.

49% of digital nomads earn the same income or more as their office job.³

In addition, digital nomads often enjoy a lower cost of living. With the wonders of Wifi, they can host meetings with clients in the US and Europe while enjoying lower cost locations like South America or South East Asia.

80% of digital nomads prefer to stay in one place for 3 to 9 months.⁴

It’s no wonder—setting up shop in one location can help nomads establish routines and boost their productivity. Plus, it’s the best way to truly soak in a new culture and experience.

The #1 reason digital nomads return home is loneliness.⁵

Distance from family and old friends can become hard to cope with. And finding community among an ever-shifting sea of locations and new acquaintances can be even harder. It’s the reason why nomads have established co-working spaces around the world. They serve as hubs for nomads to socialize and build friendships.

Time will tell if digital nomadism is a pandemic fad or a seismic shift in how we work. But if you’ve longed for a work/travel lifestyle, there’s never been a better time to make it happen.

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¹ “15 Digital Nomad Statistics and Exciting Trends 2021 Update,” Project Untethered, 2021, https://www.projectuntethered.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

² “63 Surprising Digital Nomad Statistics in 2021,” A Brother Abroad, Nov 23, 2021, https://abrotherabroad.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

³ “15 Digital Nomad Statistics and Exciting Trends 2021 Update,” Project Untethered, 2021, https://www.projectuntethered.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

⁴ “63 Surprising Digital Nomad Statistics in 2021,” A Brother Abroad, Nov 23, 2021, https://abrotherabroad.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

⁵ “63 Surprising Digital Nomad Statistics in 2021,” A Brother Abroad, Nov 23, 2021, https://abrotherabroad.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

The Importance of Financial Literacy

October 26, 2022

The Importance of Financial Literacy

There’s a good chance that you’re facing a financial obstacle right now.

Maybe you’re trying to pay down some credit card debt, facing a meager retirement fund, or just struggling day-to-day to make ends meet.

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed and helpless in those situations, so much so that you might think learning a little more about how to manage your money wouldn’t make much difference right now.

But adopting a few key financial tips is often the best and simplest step towards taking control of your paycheck and finding some peace of mind. Here are some reasons why financial literacy is an essential skill for everyone to master, and a few tips to help you get started!

It helps you overcome fear.

Let’s face it; money can seem scary. Mounting loans, debt, interest, investing—it can all be confusing and overwhelming. It may feel easier to ignore your finances and live paycheck to paycheck, never owning up to not-so-great decisions. But financial literacy gets right to the root of that fear by making things clear and simple. It empowers you to identify your mistakes and shows options to fix them.

Facing a problem is much easier once you understand it and know how to beat it. That’s why learning about money is so important if you want to start healing your financial woes.

It lets you take control of your finances.

Financial literacy does more than just help you address problems or overcome obstacles. It gives you the power to stop being a victim and take control. You can start investing in your future with confidence instead of reacting to emergencies or going into deeper debt. That means building wealth and living life on your terms instead of someone else’s. In other words…

It helps you realize your dreams.

Managing money isn’t about immediately seeing a bigger number in your bank account. It’s about having the resources and freedom to do the things you care about. Maybe that means taking your significant other on a dream vacation, giving more to a cause you care about, or providing your kids with a debt-free education.

Where to start.

Acknowledging that you need to learn more can be the hardest step. That’s why meeting with a financial advisor is something you may consider. Calculate how much you spend versus how much you make and write down some financial goals. Then find a time to discuss your next steps. You may also want to sign up for a personal finance class that will cover things like budgeting and saving.

Financial literacy is one of the most important skills you can develop. Improving your financial education takes some time but it doesn’t have to be difficult. Give me a call. I’d love to sit down and help you learn more about ways you can take control of your future!

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Protecting Your Home From Natural Disasters

October 24, 2022

Protecting Your Home From Natural Disasters

Consider this article—and all the headlines about hurricanes, fires, and tornados—a reminder that you might need protection against a natural disaster sooner or later.

But that’s easier said than done. The real question is, how?

Fortunately, many already have a necessary line of defense—homeowners insurance.

That’s because most policies cover events like wind, hail, fire, and lightning. Some also include coverage for things like water damage (from storms or leaky pipes), theft, and even volcanic eruptions.

So if that suspicious bump you keep running your lawnmower over starts spewing magma, don’t worry—your homeowners insurance will have your back!

Of course, there are always exceptions. For example, homeowners insurance typically doesn’t cover flooding, earthquakes and, unless you live in Florida, sinkholes (go figure).

Depending on where you live, that could be a huge problem. There aren’t many volcanoes in California. But earthquakes? That’s a different story.

The solution? You can purchase supplemental insurance to help cover the gaps in your standard policy.

For example, if you live in an area prone to flooding, you can purchase a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy through the FEMA website.

You can also find private companies that offer insurance for various natural disasters. Just know that the greater the risk, the higher the premium might be.

That’s why it’s always best to consult with your financial professional or insurance agent to see what’s best for you and your family.

So if the headlines have you nervous, know that there are options available to help you weather the storm—literally.

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3 Reasons to be the Financial Early Bird

October 19, 2022

3 Reasons to be the Financial Early Bird

Extra-large-blonde-roast-with-a-double-shot-of-espresso, anyone?

As the old saying goes, “The early bird catches the worm.” But not everyone is an early riser, and getting up earlier than usual can throw off a night owl’s whole day.

When it comes to building retirement wealth, however, it’s best to imitate the early worm. So grab a cup of joe—here are 3 big advantages to starting your retirement savings early:

1. Less to put away each month

Let’s say you’re 40 years old with little to no savings for retirement, but you’d like to have $1,000,000 when you retire at age 65. Twenty-five years may seem like plenty of time to achieve this goal, so how much would you need to put away each month to make that happen?

If you were stuffing money into your mattress (i.e., saving with no interest rate or rate of return), you would need to cram at least $3,333.33 in between the layers of memory foam every month. How about if you waited until you were 50 to start? Then you’d need to tuck no less than $5,555.55 around the coils. Every. Single. Month.

A savings plan that’s aggressive is simply not feasible for a majority of North Americans. Over half of Americans are just getting by, living paycheck-to-paycheck.¹ So it makes sense that the earlier you start saving for retirement, the less you’ll need to put away each month. And the less you need to put away each month, the less stress will be put on your monthly budget – and the higher your potential to have a well-funded retirement when the time comes.

But what if you could start saving earlier and apply an interest rate? This is where the second advantage comes in…

2. Power of compounding

The earlier you start saving for retirement, the longer amount of time your money has to grow and build on itself. A useful shortcut to figuring out how long it would take your money to double is the Rule of 72.

Never heard of it? Here’s how it works: Take the number 72 and divide it by your annual interest rate. The answer is approximately how many years it will take for money in an account to double.

For example, applying the Rule of 72 to $10,000 in an account at a 4% interest rate would look like this:

72 ÷ 4 = 18

That means it would take approximately 18 years for $10,000 to grow to $20,000 ($20,258 to be exact).

Using this formula reveals that the higher the interest rate, the less time it’s going to take your money to double, so be on the lookout for the highest interest rate you can find!

Getting a higher interest rate and combining it with the third advantage below? You’d be on a roll…

3. Lower life insurance premiums

A well-tailored life insurance policy may help protect retirement savings. This is particularly important if you’re outlived by your spouse as he or she approaches their retirement years.

End-of-life costs can deal a serious blow to retirement savings. If you don’t have a strategy in place to help cover funeral expenses and the loss of income, the money your spouse might need may have to come out of your retirement savings.

One reason many people don’t consider life insurance as a method of protecting their retirement is that they think a policy would cost too much.

How much do you think a $500,000 term life insurance policy would cost for a healthy 30-year-old?

$33 per month.² That’s a cost that would easily fit into most budgets!

You may still need a little caffeine for the extra kick to get an early start on powering up your brain (or your retirement savings), but sacrificing a few brand-name cups of coffee per month could finance a well-tailored life insurance policy that has the potential to protect your retirement savings.

Contact me today, and together we can work on your financial strategy for retirement, including what kind of life insurance policy would best fit you and your needs. As for your journey to the brain-boosting benefits of being bilingual – just like with retirement, it’s never too late to start. And I’ll be here to cheer you on every step of the way!

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¹ “Nearly 40 Percent of Americans with Annual Incomes over $100,000 Live Paycheck-to-Paycheck,” PR Newswire, Jun 15, 2021, https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nearly-40-percent-of-americans-with-annual-incomes-over-100-000-live-paycheck-to-paycheck-301312281.html

² “Average Cost of Life Insurance (2021): Rates by Age, Term and Policy Size,” Sterling Price, ValuePenguin, Nov 19, 2021, https://www.valuepenguin.com/average-cost-life-insurance

Financial Relief for Renters

October 17, 2022

Financial Relief for Renters

Good news—there are strategies for lowering your rent.

Even better news—you don’t have to pack up your stuff and move to make it happen.

That’s because your rent is actually negotiable. You can ask your landlord for a lower monthly rent.

But don’t just saunter into the leasing office and make your demands. That probably won’t work.

Instead, you’ll need a strategy. Here are a few approaches to help persuade your landlord to lower your rent.

Negotiate towards the end of your lease.

Remember—your landlord relies on you for their income. They want to keep you as a tenant, especially if you pay rent on time and maintain your unit.

That gives you leverage.

If your landlord has to choose between keeping you at lower rent or the hassle of cleaning out your apartment for a new tenant, they may be inclined to just lower your rent. And if they see your potential departure on the horizon, they may feel an extra push to keep you.

Offer a valuable trade.

Two things make you a valuable tenant—the money you pay in rent, and not causing headaches for your landlord.

And sometimes, landlords will accept lower rent to minimize headaches.

For instance, you could ask for lower rent in exchange for signing a longer lease. That saves them from having to replace you when you move out.

Or, you could trade your parking spot for lower rent, assuming you don’t have a car.

You could even offer to only move out during the summer or fall—prime-time for finding new tenants at higher rents—in exchange for a lower rent.

It really comes down to finding a problem they have and solving it for them if they lower your rent.

Leverage existing scripts.

It can be hard to know how to frame your argument when you’re actually negotiating with your landlord—standing up for your needs to an authority is almost always intimidating.

Fortunately, there are scripts out there that can give you a baseline of what to say. Ramit Sethi from I Will Teach You To Be Rich has a script and some tips that could make the difference between lowering your rent and ticking off your landlord.

So if you’re not sure your budget can survive a rent hike, try the strategies in this article. Let me know which worked for you, and other tips and tricks you find!

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Will This Simple Adjustment Save You Thousands on Mortgage Payments?

October 12, 2022

Will This Simple Adjustment Save You Thousands on Mortgage Payments?

The answer is yes—but with several qualifications.

The trick is to switch your mortgage payments from monthly to biweekly.

Why? Because it’s a simple way to trick yourself into paying down your mortgage faster.

Here’s an example. Suppose you’re paying $1,000 each month on your mortgage. Over a year, you’ll make twelve payments equaling $12,000.

But what if you instead paid $500 every two weeks? Now you would make twenty-six payments over a year.

But here’s where the trick happens—in a year, you would pay $13,000 instead of $12,000. That’s an extra $1,000 towards your mortgage each year. It’s like summoning a magical extra month out of your year!

And that can save you some serious time. Instead of paying off your mortgage in 30 years, you could significantly cut that time down.

It could also save you some serious money. Because you pay off the loan faster, you’ll pay less in interest.

To see the numbers yourself, check out this calculator from Bankrate. Plug in your principal loan balance, your annual interest rate, and amortization length (i.e., how long you have left on your mortgage).

On the right, you’ll see just how much less you could pay in interest over the life of your loan. Spoiler—it’s likely in the tens of thousands, depending on your situation!

Of course, there are a few things to keep in mind before switching to biweekly payments.

First, make sure your lender offers this option—not all do.

Second, remember that you’ll need to have the extra money on hand every two weeks to make the payments.

But if you can swing it, biweekly payments could be a simple way to save time and money on your mortgage.

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Travel Insurance: The Complete Guide

October 10, 2022

Travel Insurance: The Complete Guide

Postcard-worthy sunsets. Fascinating cultures and customs. Exotic people and maybe even a new language to learn – at least enough to order food, pay for souvenirs, and find the nearest bathroom.

Travel can leave us with some amazing memories and lead us to grow simply by being exposed to different ways of seeing the world. It’s also fraught with peril, as many have learned over the last year and half of lockdowns, COVID tests, and closed borders. Travel insurance has the potential to provide protection if the daydream turns into a nightmare in a number of ways.

An auto or life insurance policy is designed to provide a limited set of coverages, making the policies fairly easy to understand. Travel insurance, by comparison, can cover a wide range of unrelated risks, making the coverage and its exclusions a bit more difficult to follow. Depending on your travel insurance provider, your travel insurance may cover just a few risks or a wide gamut of potential mishaps.

So how do you know what kind of travel insurance you should purchase? Read on…

Trip Cancellation Insurance
One of the most basic and most commonly available coverage options, trip cancellation insurance provides coverage to reimburse you if you are unable to take your trip due to a number of possible reasons, including sickness or a death in the family. Cancellations for reasons such as a cruise line going bust or your tour operator going out of business are also typically covered.

Additionally, if you or a member of your party becomes ill during the trip, trip cancellation insurance may reimburse you for the unused portion of the trip. Some trips you book will allow cancellation with full reimbursement (within a certain timeframe) for any reason, whereas some trips only allow reimbursement for medical or other specific reasons – make sure you check the travel policy for any limitations before you purchase it.

Baggage Insurance
Your travel daydreams probably don’t include lost baggage or theft of personal items while abroad – but it happens to travelers every day. Baggage insurance is another common coverage found bundled with travel insurance that provides protection for your belongings while traveling.

If you already have a homeowners insurance or renters insurance policy, it’s likely that you already have this coverage in place. As a caveat, homeowners insurance and renters insurance policies typically limit the coverage for certain types of items, like jewelry, and may only pay a reduced amount for other types of items. Home insurance policies also have a deductible – typically $1,000 or more – that should be considered when deciding if you should purchase baggage insurance with your travel insurance.

Emergency Medical Coverage
Most people don’t know if their health insurance will cover them internationally – it could be that your policy does not protect you outside of the country. Accidents, illness, and other conditions that require medical assistance are border-blind and can happen anywhere, leaving you wondering how to arrange and pay for the medical attention that could be needed by you or your family. Travel health insurance can cover you in these instances and is often available as a stand-alone policy or bundled as part of a travel insurance package.

Accidental Death Coverage
Often bundled as a tag-along coverage with travel health insurance, accidental death coverage provides a limited benefit for accidental death while traveling. If you already have a life insurance policy, accidental death coverage may not be needed – and chances are good that your life insurance policy has fewer limitations and provides a higher death benefit for your named beneficiaries or loved ones.

Other Travel Coverages
A number of other options are often offered as part of travel insurance packages, including missed connection coverage, travel delay coverage, and traveler assistance. Another coverage option to consider is collision and comprehensive coverage for rented cars. Car accidents are among the leading types of mishaps when traveling. Typically, a personal car insurance policy will not cover you for vehicle damage, liability, or medical expenses when traveling abroad.

When you’re ready to cross “See the Seven Wonders of the Modern World” off your bucket list, consider travel insurance. It may provide some relief so you can concentrate on the important things, like making sure you bring the right foreign plug adapter for your hair dryer.

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Now Is The Time to Consider Life Insurance

October 5, 2022

Now Is The Time to Consider Life Insurance

If you’re young, you may not be thinking you need life insurance yet. But life insurance isn’t something only for your parents or grandparents.

Even if you have a free life insurance policy through your employer, you may not have as much coverage as you need.

There are many great reasons to buy life insurance – and a lot of those great reasons are even better reasons for young people.

So, read on for a little illumination about why you are not too young for life insurance. If you have dependents, life insurance is a must.

Take a moment and think about who depends on you and your income for their well-being. You may be surprised.

Most of us think immediately of children, but dependents can include your parents, siblings, a relative with a disability, or even a significant other. A solid life insurance policy can protect the people that count on you.

What would they do without your financial help? A life insurance policy can ensure they are protected if something were to happen to you.

The older you get, the more life insurance costs. From a simple, cost/benefit perspective, the best time to buy life insurance is when you are young. That’s when it’s the most affordable. As you age (i.e., become more likely to suffer from accident or illness), the cost of the policy will most likely go up. So buying a life insurance policy while you’re young may save you money over the long term.

Your employer-provided life insurance may be problematic. Getting life insurance through your employer is a great benefit (you should take advantage of it if it’s free).

But it may present some problems. One of the drawbacks is that this type of life insurance policy doesn’t go with you when you leave the company. That may be a challenge for young people who are moving from company to company as they climb the career ladder.

Second, employer-sponsored life insurance may simply not be enough. Even dual-income couples with no dependents should consider purchasing individual policies. Keep in mind that if one of you passed away, would the other afford to maintain your current lifestyle on a single income? Those “what if?” scenarios may be uncomfortable, but they are the best way to determine how much life insurance you need.

You’re never too young to think about your legacy. It’s not too soon to think about this. Did you know a life insurance policy can provide a lump sum to an organization you select, not just to a family member or other beneficiary? A life insurance policy can allow you to leave a meaningful legacy for the people or causes you care about. When it comes to buying life insurance, generally the younger you are when you start your policy, the better off you’re going to be.

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How to Prepare for Care Costs With a Disability

How to Prepare for Care Costs With a Disability

Access to affordable, complete care can be a challenge for many adults.

If you are someone who is living with a disability, you need to know that you will have access to the care you need now and in the future. You also need to know that you and your family will be able to afford these options. So, how can you do both and give yourself some peace of mind? You can get started by completing these crucial health care and financial planning steps.

Verify Your Medicare Eligibility If you’re approaching your 65th birthday, you should begin researching your Medicare options right now. This way, you can better understand the various Medicare parts and the coverage offered by each and make an informed decision during the next enrollment period. Even if you are not an older adult, you should still research your Medicare eligibility since your disability may still qualify you for coverage before the age of 65. You should also research whether a Medicare Advantage plan is the right choice for you. Aetna and other insurers offer MA plans which can provide additional benefits for dental, vision, hearing, and prescription drugs.

Check for Medicaid Coverages Depending on your income, you may also want to look into your Medicaid eligibility. This program differs from Medicare in that there are no age requirements. Those who are enrolled in Medicaid-sponsored insurance can take advantage of free healthcare services or may only need to pay small premiums each month to have access to care. You do need to meet certain financial requirements to be eligible for Medicaid, however, so this may not be an option for everyone. If it is, though, it can be a major boost to limited incomes.

Research Other Health Options For those living with disabilities who are not Medicare or Medicaid eligible, finding the right health insurance coverage is important for financial security. If you work, you should check with your employer about insurance offerings, since these plans tend to be more affordable. You can also research plans and enroll using the Health Insurance Marketplace but be sure to do so during annual enrollment periods, which tend to run from November to early December. Otherwise, you will need to wait another year to get coverage.

Plan for Long-Term Care Needs One aspect of care that many people forget to plan for is long-term care. This is an important need to consider, especially since the need for long-term care is so prevalent in later life. To make sure you can afford the care you need in the future, you should research insurance options and think about other ways you can plan to cover long-term care expenses, such as putting additional funds into savings or leveraging your home’s value to pay for care. By thinking about your long-term care needs now, you can also research the cost of different types of long-term care, such as assisted living communities and skilled nursing homes.

Consider End-of-Life Expenses Last but certainly not least, you have to think about how your family’s financial needs will be met when you are no longer around. Because thinking about death can be unsettling, many people forget to plan for final expenses. That often leaves loved ones struggling to cover funeral costs and pay any outstanding debts — and all in their time of grief. You can save your family this heartache by planning ahead for expenses after death. At the very least, you should have enough life insurance to pay off major debts and help with burial costs. To provide even more financial peace of mind, you should also look for additional insurance options, like burial plans.

Planning for your future health care costs isn’t just about preserving your access to care. It’s also about preserving your family’s access to the financial resources they need to survive and thrive, even if you can no longer provide those resources. By taking the time and effort to map out your finances in relation to your care needs, you are taking the initiative to fully protect the health and well-being of the people you love, as well as your future self.

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How Rising Interest Rates Could Impact Your Finances

September 28, 2022

How Rising Interest Rates Could Impact Your Finances

Rising interest rates impact more than bankers and stock brokers—they’ll likely impact your personal finances too.

Why? Because when the Federal Reserve raises interest rates, other lenders swiftly follow suit.

So if you’re carrying credit card debt, an auto loan, private student loans, or an adjustable-rate mortgage, you may face escalating monthly payments.

That means more money going straight to your creditors, and less going towards building wealth.

Here’s an example: Suppose you earn $3,000 each month, after taxes.

You pay $1,000 each month on your mortgage, $700 for your car loan, and you put $300 towards your credit card balance. After you spend $700 on living expenses, you’re left with $300 for building wealth. Not bad!

But then the Federal Reserve raises interest rates. Suppose you now owe an extra $100 each month on each of those loans. There goes that extra $300 you were saving. Now you’re left with an uncomfortable choice—drastically scale back your lifestyle so you have something leftover to save, or don’t save.

Which will you choose?

The best choice is to avoid this dilemma altogether.

How? By eliminating debt while interest rates—and monthly payments—are lower.

That way, you’ll potentially face more manageable balances and payments, even if interest rates soar.

And while others are forced to choose between lifestyle and wealth, you’ll be better positioned to have both.

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Playing the Lottery is Still a Bad Idea

September 26, 2022

Playing the Lottery is Still a Bad Idea

A full third of Americans believe that winning the lottery is the only way they can retire.¹

What? Playing a game of chance is the only way they can retire? Do you ever wonder if winning a game – where your odds are 1 in 175,000,000 – is the only way you’ll get to make Hawaiian shirts and flip-flops your everyday uniform?

Do you feel like you might be gambling with your retirement?

If you do, that’s not a good sign. But believing you may need to win the lottery to retire is somewhat understandable when the financial struggle facing a majority of North Americans is considered: 77% of millennials are living paycheck-to-paycheck, as are nearly 40% of Americans earning over $100,000.²

When you’re in a financial hole, saving for your future may feel like a gamble in the present. But believing that “it’s impossible to save for retirement” is just one of many bad money ideas floating around. Following are a few other common ones. Do any of these feel true to you?

Bad Idea #1: I shouldn’t save for retirement until I’m debt free.

False! Even as you’re working to get out from under debt, it’s important to continue saving for your retirement. Time is going to be one of the most important factors when it comes to your money and your retirement, which leads right into the next Bad Idea…

Bad Idea #2: It’s fine to wait until you’re older to save.

The truth is, the earlier you start saving, the better. Even 10 years can make a huge difference. In this hypothetical scenario, let’s see what happens with two 55-year-old friends, Baxter and Will.

  • Baxter started saving when he was 25. Over the next 10 years, Baxter put away $3,000 a year for a total of $30,000 in an account with an 8% rate of return. He stopped contributing but let it keep growing for the next 20 years.

  • Will started saving 10 years later at age 35. Will also put away $3,000 a year into an account with an 8% rate of return, but he contributed for 20 years (for a total of $60,000).

Even though Will put away twice as much as Baxter, he wasn’t able to enjoy the same account growth:

  • Baxter would achieve account growth to $218,769.

  • Will’s account growth would only be to $148,269 at the same rate of return.

Is that a little mind-bending? Do we need to check our math? (We always do.) Here’s why Baxter ended up with more in the long run: Even though he set aside less than Will did, Baxter’s money had more time to compound than Will’s, which, as you can see, really added up over the additional time. So what did Will get out of this? Unfortunately, he discovered the high cost of waiting.

Keep in mind: All figures are for illustrative purposes only and do not reflect an actual investment in any product. Additionally, they do not reflect the performance risks, taxes, expenses, or charges associated with any actual investment, which would lower performance. This illustration is not an indication or guarantee of future performance. Contributions are made at the end of the period. Total accumulation figures are rounded to the nearest dollar.

Bad Idea #3: I don’t need life insurance.

Negative! Financing a well-tailored life insurance policy is an important part of your financial strategy. Insurance benefits can cover final expenses and loss of income for your loved ones.

Bad Idea #4: I don’t need an emergency fund.

Yes, you do! An emergency fund is necessary now and after you retire. Unexpected costs have the potential to cut into retirement funds and derail savings strategies in a big way, and after you’ve given your last two-weeks-notice ever, the cost of new tires or patching a hole in the roof might become harder to cover without a little financial cushion.

Are you taking a gamble on your retirement with any of these bad ideas?

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¹ “What Are the Odds of Winning the Lottery?” Kimberly Amadeo, The Balance, Oct 24, 2021, https://www.thebalance.com/what-are-the-odds-of-winning-the-lottery-3306232

² “Nearly 40 Percent of Americans with Annual Incomes over $100,000 Live Paycheck-to-Paycheck,” PR Newswire, Jun 15, 2021, https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nearly-40-percent-of-americans-with-annual-incomes-over-100-000-live-paycheck-to-paycheck-301312281.html

The Pros and Cons of Budget Cars

September 21, 2022

The Pros and Cons of Budget Cars

Buying a car can be pricey.

The average used car costs over $33,000,¹ while the average for a new one is around $48,000.² When it comes to transportation (or anything else for that matter), it only makes sense that you’d want to save as much money as possible. But are there times when buying a used or budget car is a better investment than buying a new one? Here are some questions to ask yourself before you make that purchase.

How much mileage can you get out of this car?

One of the big things to consider when researching a budget car is how many miles of prior travel you’re paying for. Buying a cheap (although unreliable) car that breaks down on the regular due to wear and tear may give you fewer miles for your money than paying more for a car that might last 10 years. If you’re committed to buying used, you’ll probably want a mechanic to inspect the car for issues that might affect your car’s lifespan.

How much will maintenance and repairs cost you?

You might be one of the few who know someone with the auto know-how to keep an ancient car running for years. However, the average person will need to have car problems repaired at a professional shop, which can become expensive if it constantly needs work. This can be especially costly if you sink thousands into maintenance only for your vehicle to die for good earlier than expected. It’s worth considering that buying new might save you a huge hassle and potentially give you more miles for your money.

How does the interest rate compare for a new car vs. used?

The uncertainty involved with buying a used or budget car can increase the cost of financing. Lenders will often charge you higher interest for purchasing a used car than they would a new one.³ Having a high credit score will improve your rates, but that extra cost can still add up over time.

What you’re trying to avoid is buying a used piece of junk that requires constant maintenance at a shop, has a higher interest rate, and gives out too soon. There are definitely used and budget cars out there that have great value. Just be sure to do your research before you make such a significant investment!

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¹ “Consumers are shelling out an average $10,000 more for used cars than if prices were ‘normal,’ research shows,” Sarah O’Brien, CNBC, Jul 21 2022, https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/21/consumers-paying-average-10000-above-normal-prices-for-used-cars.html

² “The Average Price of a New Car Is Creeping Toward $50,000,” Brad Tuttle, Money, Sep 14, 2022, https://money.com/new-car-prices-average-50000/

³ “Why Do Used Cars Have Higher Interest Rates?” Doug Demuro, Autotrader, Oct 13, 2013, https://www.autotrader.com/car-shopping/why-do-used-cars-have-higher-interest-rates-215730

401(k) vs. IRA—What's the Difference?

September 19, 2022

401(k) vs. IRA—What's the Difference?

When it comes to building wealth, the best thing you can do is start early and contribute as much money as possible.

But with so many different retirement savings options available, it can be difficult to know where to put your money. Should you open a 401(k) through your employer? Or would an IRA be better for you?

To help you decide, let’s take a look at how 401(k)s and IRAs work, and the pros and cons of each.

A 401(k) is a retirement savings plan sponsored by an employer. It’s a great way to save for retirement because it offers several advantages.

For one, 401(k)s have much higher contribution limits than IRAs. In 2022, 401(k)s have a contribution limit of $20,500, while the limit for IRAs is $6,000.¹

This means you can potentially save a lot more money in a 401(k) if you have income to spare.

Another advantage of 401(k)s is that many employers offer matching contributions. This is free money that your employer contributes to your retirement. It’s a great way to supercharge your savings.

But don’t write off IRAs just yet—they have some advantages of their own.

For one, you don’t need an employer to open an IRA. This makes them a great option if you’re self-employed or if your employer doesn’t offer a retirement savings plan.

IRAs also give you a lot more control over your investments than 401(k)s. With a 401(k), you’re limited to the investment options offered by your employer.

With an IRA, you can choose from a wider range of investments, including stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. This can potentially help you earn a higher return.

So, which is better—a 401(k) or an IRA? The answer depends on your individual circumstances.

If you have a 401(k) through your employer, it’s generally a good idea to contribute at least enough to get the employer match. After that, you can consider contributing to an IRA as well.

If you don’t have a 401(k) or if you’re self-employed, an IRA may be the better option for you.

No matter which type of account you choose, the most important thing is to start saving for retirement now. The sooner you start, the more time your money has to grow.

Happy saving!

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¹ “401(k) vs. IRA: What’s the Difference?” Yolander Prinzel, Investopedia, March 07, 2022, https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/12/401k.asp

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